princeps

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: prínceps

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin princeps (first, foremost). Doublet of prince.

Noun[edit]

princeps

  1. One who, or that which, is foremost, original, etc.
  2. The editio princeps, or first edition of a book.

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Latin princeps. Doublet of prins.

Noun[edit]

princeps m (uncountable)

  1. princeps; Roman emperor

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *priisemokaps by syncope. Surface etymology: prīmus (first) +‎ -ceps (catcher).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈpriːn.keps/, [ˈpɾiːŋkɛps̠] or IPA(key): /ˈprin.keps/, [ˈpɾɪŋkɛps̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈprin.t͡ʃeps/, [ˈpɾin̠ʲt͡ʃɛps]
  • Note: the length of the first vowel might have varied, being subject to one or more rounds of Osthoff's Law which shortens vowels before an /n/ in the same syllable. The long /ī/, as reflected by Ancient Greek, must have been maintained by analogy with prīmus, but an archaic Italian form prence points to a form in /ĭ/.[1][2]

Adjective[edit]

prī̆nceps (genitive prī̆ncipis); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. first, foremost
  2. chief, distinguished

Declension[edit]

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative prī̆nceps prī̆ncipēs prī̆ncipia
Genitive prī̆ncipis prī̆ncipium
Dative prī̆ncipī prī̆ncipibus
Accusative prī̆ncipem prī̆nceps prī̆ncipēs prī̆ncipia
Ablative prī̆ncipī prī̆ncipibus
Vocative prī̆nceps prī̆ncipēs prī̆ncipia

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • prī̆nceps cīvitās (first citizen) (a title of the Roman Emperors, beginning with Caesar Augustus)

Noun[edit]

prī̆nceps m or f (genitive prī̆ncipis); third declension

  1. a leader, first man or woman, head
    The official Style of the British sovereign :
    Elisabeth II, Deī Grātiā Britanniārum Rēgnōrumque Suōrum Cēterōrum Rēgīna, Cōnsortiōnis Populōrum Prīnceps, Fideī Dēfēnsor
    Elizabeth II, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain <and Northern Ireland> and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith
  2. a principal person
  3. an author, originator, founder
  4. a chief, director
  5. a prince, sovereign
  6. (military, as plural) company or division of the second line of soldiers

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative prī̆nceps prī̆ncipēs
Genitive prī̆ncipis prī̆ncipum
Dative prī̆ncipī prī̆ncipibus
Accusative prī̆ncipem prī̆ncipēs
Ablative prī̆ncipe prī̆ncipibus
Vocative prī̆nceps prī̆ncipēs

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • princeps in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • princeps in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • princeps in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • princeps in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be considered the foremost orator: primum or principem inter oratores locum obtinere
    • to be considered the foremost orator: oratorum principem esse
    • to be the chief man in the state: principem civitatis esse
    • to hold the first position in the state: principem in re publica locum obtinere
    • statesmen: principes rem publicam administrantes or simply principes
    • to occupy the first, second position in the state: principem (primum), secundum locum dignitatis obtinere
    • the aristocracy (as a leading class in government): principes or primores
  • princeps in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • princeps in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • princeps in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, page 78
  2. ^ Sayeed, Ollie (01 Jan 2017) "Osthoff’s Law in Latin", in Indo-European Linguistics, Volume 5, Issue 1, page 158