resection

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English[edit]

Noun[edit]

resection (plural resections)

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  1. (medicine) The surgical excision of part or all of a tissue or organ.
  2. (surveying) A method of determining a position by using a map and compass bearings for two additional points.
  3. A section of a tire that has had worn tread replaced.
    • 1955 April, James Joseph, “Tire Doctor”, in Popular Mechanics, volume 103, number 4, page 238:
      A bruised carcass can often be saved by investing $11.00 in a resection.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

resection (third-person singular simple present resections, present participle resectioning, simple past and past participle resectioned)

  1. (medicine) To excise part or all of a tissue or organ.
    • 2011, Werner Mang, Manual of Aesthetic Surgery, ISBN 354078795X, page 167:
      Most articles published after this date, however, mention the resectioning of fat around the eyes as an essential constituent of corrective lid surgery.
    • 2012, Megan Kate Nelson, Ruin Nation: Destruction and the American Civil War, ISBN 0820342513, page 177:
      ...these problems and the overwhelming numbers of wounded men flooding into hospitals after battles meant that amputations and resectioning of joints (the removal of bones) became standard protocol.
    • 2014, Tim Bell, Right or Wrong: The Memoirs of Lord Bell, ISBN 1472909372, page 183:
      Anyway, they did the operation, removed a huge lump, resectioned my colon, and gave me the news that they thought that the tumour hadn't spread.
  2. (surveying) To determine positions using compass bearings based on three or more known positions.
    • 1913, University of Texas Record - Volume 11, page 454:
      The Senior class was drilled in the use of the plane table; in resectioning on unknown points, the "three point problem," etc.
    • 1918, Michigan Engineers Annual - Volumes 36-37, page 125:
      After construction of earthwork is completed the work should be resectioned and the estimates for final payment made according to the information thus obtained.
    • 2014, Aylmer Johnson, Plane and Geodetic Surveying, Second Edition, ISBN 1466589566, page 27:
      For an independent check of the work, and a better indication of its accuracy, the point should be resectioned, as described in the next section.
  3. (digital image processing) To estimate a camera projection matrix from known position data and image entities.
    • 2004, Richard Hartley & ‎Andrew Zisserman, Multiple View Geometry in Computer Vision, ISBN 1139449141, page 537:
      The camera matrices and 3D structure are then computed for the frames 1-2-3-4, for example by first resectioning and then bundle adjustment.
    • 2012, Yanning Zhang, ‎Zhi-Hua Zhou, & ‎Changshui Zhang, Intelligent Science and Intelligent Data Engineering, ISBN 364231919X, page 459:
      Based on the convex cone, they give a further improved method for homography and camera resectioning'.
    • 2013, Mubarak Shah & ‎Rakesh Kumar, Video Registration, ISBN 1461504597, page 24:
      The cost can be immediately reduced by only using key frames for the initial reconstruction, and then resectioning the other frames.
  4. To redivide into new sections.
    • 1879, Journal of the House of Representatives of the State of Vermont, page 121:
      Also that the bill be resectioned to conform to the several amendments ; Which amendments were severally agreed to, and the bill as amended read the third time and passed.
    • 1880, ‎Nathan Clifford & ‎William Henry Clifford, Reports of Cases Determined in the Circuit Court of the United States for the First Circuit from May term 1869 to May term 1878, page 27:
      Mr. Dana resectioned the text, and added marginal titles; a work of much labor, not called for by his contract, and performed solely for the good of the book.
    • 1910, Antiaircraft Journal - Volume 34, page 176:
      The projectiles were cleaned and weighed, and the powder blended, resectioned and reweighed by each of the companies who used it.
    • 2014, Martin Meisel, Realizations, ISBN 1400856094, page 181:
      Henry Bishop's Weber-influenced score for Manfred entails a good deal of resectioning of the text, and is quite operatic in character.
  5. (education) To transfer students into new class groupings or grade levels.
    • 1925, Nicholas Murray Butler, ‎Frank Pierrepont Graves, & ‎William McAndrew, Educational Review - Volume 69, page 153:
      In connection with a scheme of resectioning, a number of questions naturally present themselves. When the students complete their first term or first year of the subject in the most efficient, intermediate, and least efficient sections, what process of equalization is going to occur at the beginning of the second term or year?
    • 1973, K. Bruce Galloway & ‎Robert Bowie Johnson, West Point; America's power fraternity, page 71:
      This is easily understandable when, with resectioning, a cadet is offered the opportunity to underperform with the only punishment being an easier class!
    • 2015, Brian R. McEnany, For Brotherhood and Duty, ISBN 0813160634, page 37:
      Tully's class was initially assigned to sections alphabetically and then resectioned later in the year according to academic merit.
  6. (civil engineering) To deepen or widen a river or other natural watercourse for flood control, land drainage, or navigation.
    • 2012, Mike Acreman, The Hydrology of the UK: A Study of Change, ISBN 1134661339, page 70:
      In England and Wales, this has resulted in significant regional variations (Table 3.4) with the Anglian region returning the highest proportions of embanked and resectioned river channels.
    • 2012, Philip Boon & ‎Paul Raven, River Conservation and Management, ISBN 0470682086, page 86:
      The second case study illustrates the opportunities for linking data from different monitoring schemes by examining the relationship between two potential stressors: organic pollution and resectioning of the river channel.
    • 2013, James L. Martin, Hydro-Environmental Analysis: Freshwater Environments, ISBN 1482206080, page 213:
      Resectioned rivers are commonly trapezoidal and wider and deeper than natural rivers.
  7. (civil engineering, chiefly India) To remove material from the surface of a road in order to achieve a uniform thickness.
    • 1908, Burma Rights Movement for Action, Report on the Administration of Burma, page 54:
      The road from Periwegon to Ananbaw was resectioned and raised in places.
    • 1911, Report on the Municipal Administration of Calcutta, page xv:
      ...a very large quantity of metal obtained by resectioning and cutting down roads to the regulation camber was used in repairs.
    • 1960, ‎E. L. Marryat, P. W. D. Handbook, Bombay:
      The quantity of asphalt used will vary with the nature of the work. Where no resectioning of the road is necessary, i.e., where the new 2" layer is uniform in thickness on the picked up old surface 0-9cwt, or 100lbs. per 100 sq. ft. will be sufficient, as the binding material in the old surface works up through the new metal.
  8. To thinly slice a specimen as part of its preparation, such as when preparing a microscope slide.
    • 1971, Canadian Journal of Soil Science - Volume 51, page 247:
      Mounting with Lakeside-70 thermoplastic cement was used extensively but it was too brittle, caused occasional plucking of sand grains during grinding and polishing, and was not strong enough to hold the mounted specimen during resectioning; its thermoplastic requirements caused warping of specimens.
    • 2007, Adalberto Merighi & ‎Giorgio Carmignoto, Cellular and Molecular Methods in Neuroscience Research, ISBN 0387224602, page 193:
      After fixation, the 400-μm-thick slice should be resectioned into 50-μm thick sections for further histological processing.
    • 2012, Stanley B. Kater & ‎Charles Nicholson, Intracellular Staining in Neurobiology, ISBN 3642871232, page 79:
      Correlating very small isolated profiles by either method was difficult because of distortions caused by resectioning and the heating of the plastic by the electron beam.
    • 2013, Kevin Padian & ‎Ellen-Thérèse Lamm, Bone Histology of Fossil Tetrapods, ISBN 0520273524, page 59:
      They include a critical step of vacuum embedding the specimen, as well as cutting and mounting individual serial sections, as opposed to the traditional method described of preparing and mounting an entire block followed by resectioning to produce a thinner mounted sample (Neese 2004).
  9. To replace a worn section of tire with new tread.
    • 1913, B.F. Goodrich Company, The Goodrich - Volumes 3-4, page 97:
      Where, however, this chafing extends through the fabric or by reason of an aggravated skid,—the fabric is ground through at any point, resectioning would be necessary in addition.
    • 1943, United States Congress Senate Special Committee to Study Problems of American Small Business, Problems of American Small Business - Parts 16-24, page 2515:
      So far as our company-owned stores are concerned, we mount tires, new. tires, that are purchased and arrange for the repair or recapping or resectioning of tires that are brought to us. We do not own or operate molds or equipment for resectioning or recapping tires.
    • 1970, Board of Contract appeals decisions - Volume 69, Issue 2, page 28:
      After the incident, appellant did have the damaged tire resectioned at a cost of $204.00.
  10. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To readmit involuntarily into a mental hospital.
    • 2002, Legal Action: The Bulletin of the Legal Action Group, page 12:
      According to Dyson LJ, mental health professionals will be acting unlawfully in resectioning a patient following discharge by a tribunal if 'the sole or principal ground on which they rely is one which in substance has been rejected by the tribunal.'
    • 2009, Simon Richard Lee, The Fourth Helen of the Apocalypse!, ISBN 1409294838, page 28:
      After just three weeks at home, with yet more 'abuse in the community' I am resectioned, and Helen re-admitted the same night.
    • 2013, Rod Madocks, Ship of Fools, ISBN 1907869891:
      He argued that the only way that his client could be retained in the hospital was if she was resectioned altogether. To be assessed for a new section she had to show fresh evidence of mental disorder and risk to others.

Anagrams[edit]