scorpion

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See also: Scorpion

English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English scorpioun, skorpioun, schorpion, schorpiun, partly from Old English sċorpio and partly from Anglo-Norman scorpïun, Old French scorpïon, escorpïon; all from Latin scorpio, ultimately from Ancient Greek σκορπίος (skorpíos). The cheerleading move is so called because of the resemblance of the raised foot to a scorpion's stinger.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

scorpion (plural scorpions)

  1. Any of various arachnids of the order Scorpiones, related to the spiders, characterised by two large front pincers and a curved tail with a poisonous sting in the end.
    The peasants put two scorpions in a large bottle, and then take wagers as to which will win the struggle. Slowly the scorpions circle each other, until one lashes out at the other, and strikes him dead.
  2. An ancient military engine for hurling stones and other missiles.
  3. A cheerleading move in which one foot is pulled back and held up with both hands while the performer stands on the other foot.

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French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

scorpion m (plural scorpions)

  1. scorpion

Further reading[edit]

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Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French scorpion, from Latin scorpiō, scorpiōnem, from Ancient Greek σκορπίος (skorpíos).

Noun[edit]

scorpion m (plural scorpions)

  1. (Jersey) mole cricket

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French scorpion, from Latin scorpio, from Ancient Greek σκορπίος (skorpíos). Doublet of scorpie.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

scorpion m (plural scorpioni)

  1. scorpion

Declension[edit]