steven

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See also: Steven and števen

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English steven ‎(voice, command, constitution), from Old English stefn, stemn ‎(voice), from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō ‎(voice), from Proto-Indo-European *stomen- ‎(mouth, muzzle). Cognate with Old Frisian stifne, stemme ‎(voice), Old Saxon stemna ‎(voice) (Dutch stem), Old High German stimma, stimna ‎(voice) (German Stimme), Gothic 𐍃𐍄𐌹𐌱𐌽𐌰 ‎(stibna, voice), Ancient Greek στόμα ‎(stóma, mouth). See also stevvon.

Noun[edit]

steven ‎(plural stevens)

  1. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) The voice, now especially when loud or strong.
  2. (obsolete) Speech, language.
  3. (obsolete) Voice; cry; that which is uttered; petition; prayer.
  4. (obsolete) A word, command, bidding or direction given.
  5. (archaic) A promise, one's word.
  6. (obsolete) An outcry, shout, or loud call; a clamour/clamor, noise; din.
    • 1826, James Hogg, Queen Hynde vi, in Poems (1865) 262:
      All nature roar'd in one dire steven; Heaven cried to earth, and earth to heaven.
  7. (obsolete) A sound, the sound of a horn; melody, tune; song; sound made by an animal or a bird.
    • 1566, William Addlington, translator, The Golden Asse , Apuleius
      [] whereby the little birds weening that the spring time had bin come, did chirp and sing in their steven melodiously
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

steven ‎(third-person singular simple present stevens, present participle stevening, simple past and past participle stevened)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To speak; utter; describe; tell of; name.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To voice an opinion; vote.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To vouch; speak up (for).
  4. (transitive, dialectal) To bespeak.
  5. (intransitive, dialectal) To talk; call out; shout; make a noise.
Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English steven ‎(appointment), from Old English stefn ‎(a time, turn, tour of duty), from Proto-Germanic *stabnijaz, *stabnijô ‎(fixed time), from Proto-Indo-European *stebh- ‎(a stake, post; to support, stamp, insist, become angry). Cognate with Middle Low German stevene ‎(a court appointment), Old Norse stefna ‎(appointment, meeting). More at staff.

Noun[edit]

steven ‎(plural stevens)

  1. (obsolete) A time, occasion.
    • 1788, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens, The dramatick writings of Will. Shakspere, with the Notes of all the various Commentators:
      I should choose to read "at this dull season," rather than this dull steven, [...]— John Monck Mason.
  2. (obsolete) A set time; a date or appointment.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VIII:
      And that same nyght that the steavyn was sette betwyxte Segwarydes wyff and Sir Trystrames, so Kynge Marke armed and made hym redy [...].

Verb[edit]

steven ‎(third-person singular simple present stevens, present participle stevening, simple past and past participle stevened)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To call; summon; command; appoint.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To alternate; take turns.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch stēvene.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ste‧ven

Noun[edit]

steven m ‎(plural stevens)

  1. the part of a ship's deck that stretches along the entire length of the keel including the bow and the stern

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English stefn, stemn ‎(voice, sound). More at steven.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

steven (plural stevens)

  1. The voice of a human being; a voice.
  2. A vocal sound.
  3. sound; tonal pattern.
  4. Manner of speaking.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English stefn ‎(appointed time).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

steven

  1. time, set time, appointment
    • c. 1385, Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Knight's Tale’, Canterbury Tales:
      It is ful fair a man to bere hym euene, / For al day meeten men at vnset steuene.
  2. period of time, occasion
    • 1398, John Trevisa, trans. Bartholomaeus, De Proprietatibus Rerum:
    • Suche stenche is continual and comeþ nouȝt by stemnes.
      (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English stewin, from Old English stefn ‎(voice), from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō ‎(voice), from Proto-Indo-European *stomen- ‎(mouth, muzzle). Cognates: see above, steven.

Noun[edit]

steven (plural stevens)

  1. voice
  2. a loud outcry