travail

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Old French travail ‎(suffering, torment), from Vulgar Latin tripalium ‎(an instrument of torture), from Latin tripālis ‎(having or propped up by three stakes).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

travail ‎(plural travails or travaux)

  1. (archaic) Arduous or painful exertion; excessive labor, suffering, hardship. [from 13th c.]
    • Hooker
      As everything of price, so this doth require travail.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essayes, London: Edward Blount, OCLC 946730821, II.20:
      Travell and pleasure, most unlike in nature, are notwithstanding followed together by a kind of I wot not what natural conjunction [].
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 38:
      He had thought of making a destiny for himself, through laborious and untiring travail.
  2. Specifically, the labor of childbirth. [from 13th c.]
  3. (obsolete, countable) An act of working; labor (US), labour (British). [14th-18th c.]
  4. (obsolete) The eclipse of a celestial object. [17th c.]
  5. Obsolete form of travel.
  6. Alternative form of travois (a kind of sled)

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

Verb[edit]

travail ‎(third-person singular simple present travails, present participle travailing, simple past and past participle travailed)

  1. To toil.
    • Latimer
      slothful persons which will not travail for their livings
  2. To go through the labor of childbirth.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, John XIV:
      A woman when she traveyleth hath sorowe, be cause her houre is come: but as sone as she is delivered off her chylde she remembreth no moare her anguysshe, for ioye that a man is borne in to the worlde.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French travail, from the singular form from Old French travail, from Vulgar Latin tripalium ‎(torture instrument), from Latin tripālis ‎(having three stakes). Compare Occitan trabalh, Catalan treball, Italian travaglio, Portuguese trabalho, Spanish trabajo.

The plural from Old French travauz, from travailz with l-vocalization before a consonant. The final -auz was later spelled -aux, and the sequence -au-, which once represented a diphthong, now represents an o sound.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

travail m ‎(plural travaux)

  1. work; labor
  2. job
  3. workplace

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French travail.

Noun[edit]

travail m (plural travails)

  1. suffering; pain

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (travail, supplement)

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin tripalium ‎(torture instrument), from Latin tripālis ‎(having three stakes). Compare Occitan trabalh, Catalan treball, Italian travaglio, Portuguese trabalho, Spanish trabajo.

Noun[edit]

travail m ‎(oblique plural travauz or travailz, nominative singular travauz or travailz, nominative plural travail)

  1. suffering, torment

Descendants[edit]