uba

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Ubá

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *upa, borrowed from Proto-Baltic [Term?] (Latvian pupa). Cognate with Livonian pubā. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

uba (genitive oa, partitive uba)

  1. bean

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʔù.báː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [ʔʊ̀.báː]

Noun[edit]

ùbā m (plural ùbànnī, possessed form ùban)

  1. father
  2. head, leader, patron

Coordinate terms[edit]


Laz[edit]

Noun[edit]

uba (Atina, Vizha, Artasheni, Vitse–Arkabi, Khopa–Batumi)

  1. Latin spelling of უბა (uba)

Mirandese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūva.

Noun[edit]

uba f (plural ubas)

  1. grape

Old Tupi[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʔuβ̞a/, /ˈtuβ̞a/

Noun[edit]

uba (t-, t-)

  1. one's male parent, father
  2. brother of one's father, paternal uncle
  3. cousin of one's father

Usage notes[edit]

  • The stem uba could never be used inside a sentence without a prefix. The absolute form tuba was used whenever the noun was not possessed.

References[edit]


Ternate[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay ubat (gunpowder). Compare with Indonesian obat.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

uba

  1. gunpowder

References[edit]

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

West Makian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly from an older ubat (if not an error), recorded in van der Crab's De Moluksche Eilanden's wordlist (as oebat).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

uba

  1. (transitive) to carry

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of uba (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person touba mouba auba
2nd person nouba fouba
3rd person inanimate iuba douba
animate
imperative nuuba, uba fuuba, uba

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[1], Pacific linguistics