Appendix:Italian nouns

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Irregular plurals[edit]

The table below lists Italian words that have irregular plurals. Not included are words that follow any of the following rules:

  1. Words that end in a that change the final vowel to e (eg, casa)
  2. Words that end in cia that change this ending to ce (eg, goccia)
  3. Words that end in co or ca that change these endings to chi or che, respectively (eg, buco and forca)
  4. Words that end in e that change the final vowel to i (eg, cane)
  5. Words that end in gia that change this ending to ge (eg, spiaggia)
  6. Words that end in go or ga that change these endings to ghi or ghe, respectively (eg, ago and riga)
  7. Words that end in i that do not change in the plural (eg, sci)
  8. Words that end in io that change this ending to i or ii (eg, microscopio, which becomes microscopi, and zio, which becomes zii)
  9. Words of Greek origin that end in ma or ta that change these endings to mi or ti, respectively. (eg, diploma and dentista)
  10. Words that end in o that change the final vowel to i (eg, topo)
  11. Words of one syllable that do not change in the plural (eg, re)
  12. Words stressed on the final syllable, which do not change in the plural (eg, caffè)
  13. Words of foreign origin that do not change in the plural (eg, yacht)
  14. Short forms, which do not change in the plural (eg, auto)
  15. Symbols or letters, which do not change in the plural


Singular Plural Notes
ala
ali
braccio
braccia
Only when meaning “arm” either in its anatomical sense or referring to the measuring unit, otherwise the regular plural is used; the irregular plural is feminine
bue
buoi
ciglio
ciglia
Only when meaning “eyelash,” when it means “edge” the regular plural is used; the irregular plural is feminine
corno
corna
Only when referring to horns collectively, otherwise the regular plural is used; the irregular plural is feminine
dio
dei
The article used with the plural is gli
dito
dita
Only when referring to fingers or toes collectively, otherwise the regular plural is used; the irregular plural is feminine
labbro
labbra
Only when meaning “lip,” when it means “edge” the regular plural is used; the irregular plural is feminine
mano
mani
The plural is regular, but its gender is feminine
miglio
miglia
This plural is feminine
paio
paia
This plural is feminine
uomo
uomini
osso
ossa
Only when referring collectively to the bones of the human body, otherwise the regular plural is used; the irregular plural is feminine
uovo
uova
This plural is feminine

See also[edit]