Roma

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See also: Róma, Rōma, roma, romà, and romã

English[edit]

A Roma girl in Serbia.

Etymology 1[edit]

Related to Rom, from Romani rom, probably ultimately from Sanskrit डोम (ḍoma, member of a low caste of travelling musicians and dancers in Kashmir).[1] The names of the Lom and Dom are related.

The other major categories of words for the Roma are cognates of Gypsy (words related to Egypt) and cognates of tzigane (words derived from Greek); see those entries for more information.

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. A nomadic people with origins in India, the Romani.
  2. A subgroup of the Romani people found primary in Eastern Europe.
  3. A variety of the Romani language (or occasionally) the Romani macrolanguage.
Translations[edit]
  • For: translations which are exonyms (not cognates of the Romani term for themselves), see Gypsy.

Noun[edit]

Roma (plural Romas)

  1. A Romani; a member of the Roma/Romani people.
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Roma (not comparable)

  1. Romani: of or pertaining to the Roma people.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ See e.g. Matras, Romani, A linguistic Introduction (2005)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Italian and Latin Roma (Rome).

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. A variety of tomato.
  2. Any of a number of places, including a city in Texas and a city in Queensland.
  3. A female given name of English-speakers.

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. An Austronesian language of Indonesia.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Rōma.

Proper noun[edit]

Roma f

  1. Rome

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Rōma.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Roma f

  1. Rome
  2. The letter R in the Italian phonetic alphabet

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain. Roman mythology derived the name from Romulus, a legendary founder and first king. The word may be of Etruscan origin, as Ruma was one of the Etruscan gens (clan, tribe), and Rumon was the Etruscan name for the Tiber River.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Rōma f sg (genitive Rōmae, locative Rōmae); first declension

  1. Rome
    Ut Roma jugum omnibus terris imponeret.
    That Rome might overcome all countries.
  2. ablative of Rōma
    Venit a Roma.
    He came from Rome.

Inflection[edit]

First declension with locative.

Number Singular
nominative Rōma
genitive Rōmae
dative Rōmae
accusative Rōmam
ablative Rōmā
vocative Rōma
locative Rōmae

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Rōma (Rome).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. the city of Rome

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Papiamentu[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. Rome

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese Roma, from Latin Rōma (Rome).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈʁo.ma/, /ˈʁo.mɐ/

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. the city of Rome
  2. Ancient Rome
  3. the Catholic Church

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Rōma.

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. Rome

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Rōma.

Proper noun[edit]

Roma f

  1. Rome

Related terms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Roma

  1. Rome (province)

Declension[edit]