romance

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See also: Romance, românce, and romancé

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English romauns, roumance, from Anglo-Norman and Old French romanz, romans (the vernacular language of France, as opposed to Latin), from Medieval Latin rōmānicē, Vulgar Latin rōmānicē (in the Roman language, adv), from rōmānicus (roman, adj) from rōmānus (a Roman).

Noun[edit]

romance (plural romances)

  1. An intimate relationship between two people; a love affair.
  2. A strong obsession or attachment for something or someone.
  3. Idealized love which is pure or beautiful.
  4. A mysterious, exciting, or fascinating quality.
  5. A story or novel dealing with idealized love.
  6. An embellished account of something; an idealized lie.
  7. A story relating to chivalry; a story involving knights, heroes, adventures, quests, etc.
  8. An adventure, or series of extraordinary events, resembling those narrated in romances.
    His life was a romance.
  9. A dreamy, imaginative habit of mind; a disposition to ignore what is real.
    a girl full of romance
  10. (music) A romanza, or sentimental ballad.

Antonyms[edit]

Quotations[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Verb[edit]

romance (third-person singular simple present romances, present participle romancing, simple past and past participle romanced)

  1. Woo; court.
  2. (intransitive) To write or tell romantic stories, poetry, letters, etc.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

romance f (plural romances)

  1. ballad, love song

Verb[edit]

romance

  1. first-person singular present indicative of romancer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of romancer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of romancer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of romancer
  5. second-person singular imperative of romancer

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

romance (comparative plus romance, superlative le plus romance)

  1. Romance

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal romans, from Medieval Latin, Late Latin rōmānicē (in a Roman manner), from Latin rōmānicus (Roman), from rōmānus (Roman), from Rōma (Rome).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

romance m (plural romances)

  1. (literature) novel (work of prose fiction)
  2. romance; love affair

Synonyms[edit]

  • (love affair): caso

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

romance m, f (plural romances, not comparable)

  1. (linguistics) Romance (of the languages derived from Latin)

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Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal romans, from Vulgar Latin *romanĭce, compare Medieval Latin rōmānice, ultimately from Latin rōmānicus < rōmānus. Cognates include Old French romanz, whence the modern French noun roman (novel).[1]

Adjective[edit]

romance m, f (plural romances)

  1. Romance

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

romance m (plural romances)

  1. romance, love affair
  2. novel
  3. Spanish (language)

Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

romance

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of romanzar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of romanzar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of romanzar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of romanzar.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1964, Albert Dauzat; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand, “romance”, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse: