bard

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: bárd and Bård

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed in the 15th century from Scottish Gaelic bard, Irish bard, and Welsh bardd.

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

bard (plural bards)

  1. A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.
    • 1924: ARISTOTLE. Metaphysics. Translated by W. D. Ross. Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001. Available at: <http://www.classicallibrary.org/aristotle/metaphysics/>. Book 1, Part 2.
      But the divine power cannot be jealous (nay, according to the proverb, 'bards tell a lie'),
  2. (by extension) A poet.
    the bard of Avon
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French barde. English since the late 15th century.

Noun[edit]

bard (plural bards)

  1. A piece of defensive (or, sometimes, ornamental) armor for a horse's neck, breast, and flanks; a barb. (Often in the plural.)
  2. Defensive armor formerly worn by a man at arms.
  3. (cooking) A thin slice of fat bacon used to cover any meat or game.
  4. The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.
  5. Specifically, Peruvian bark.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bard (third-person singular simple present bards, present participle barding, simple past and past participle barded)

  1. To cover a horse in defensive armor.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 29:
      The defensive armor with which the horses of the ancient knights or men at arms were covered, or, to use the language of the time, barded, consisted of the following pieces made either of metal or jacked leather, the Chamfron, Chamfrein or Shaffron, the Criniere or Main Facre, the Poitrenal, Poitral or Breast Plate, and the Croupiere or Buttock Piece.
  2. (cooking) To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bard, from Proto-Celtic *bardos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bard m (genitive baird, nominative plural baird)

  1. bard
  2. poet

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bard bhard mbard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic بارد (bārid).

Adjective[edit]

bard

  1. cold

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bard, from Proto-Celtic *bardo-s.

Noun[edit]

bard m (genitive ?, plural bardyn)

  1. bard
  2. poet

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bard vard mard
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Synonyms[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bardos.

Noun[edit]

bard m

  1. bard
  2. poet

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]