corporal

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɔː.pɹəl/, /ˈkɔː.pɜ.ɹəl/
  • (US) enPR: kôr'pər-əl, kôr'prəl, IPA(key): /ˈkɔːɹ.pɜ˞.əɫ/, /ˈkɔːɹ.pɹəɫ/

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French corporal (French corporel), from Latin corporālis, from Latin corpus (body); compare corporeal.

Adjective[edit]

corporal (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Having a physical, tangible body; corporeal.
    • 1603-06, Macbeth: Ac.1 Sc3, Wm. Shakespeare.
      Into the air; and what seem'd corporal melted as breath into the wind.
  2. Of or pertaining to the body, especially the human body.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Corrupted from the French caporal, from the Italian caporale, from capo (head, leader) from the Latin caput (head).

Noun[edit]

corporal (plural corporals)

  1. (military) A non-commissioned officer army rank with NATO code OR-4. The rank below a sergeant but above a lance corporal and private.
  2. A non-commissioned officer rank in the police force, below a sergeant but above a private or patrolman.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From the Latin corporale, the neuter of corporalis representing the doctrine of transubstantiation in which the Eucharist becomes the body of Christ.

Noun[edit]

corporal (plural corporals)

  1. (ecclesiastical) The white linen cloth on which the elements of the Eucharist are placed; a communion cloth.
    • 1891, Oscar Wilde, “XI”, in The Picture of Dorian Gray:
      He had [] many corporals, chalice-veils, and sudaria
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corporālis.

Adjective[edit]

corporal (epicene, plural corporals)

  1. corporal, bodily

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corporālis.

Adjective[edit]

corporal m, f (masculine and feminine plural corporals)

  1. corporal

Noun[edit]

corporal m (plural corporals)

  1. corporal (linen cloth)

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corporālis.

Adjective[edit]

corporal m, f (plural corporais)

  1. corporal, bodily

Noun[edit]

corporal m (plural corporais)

  1. corporal (linen cloth)

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

corporal

  1. Alternative form of corporel.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corporālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

corporal m, f (plural corporais; comparable)

  1. corporal, carnal

Noun[edit]

corporal m (plural corporais)

  1. corporal

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corporālis.

Adjective[edit]

corporal m, f (plural corporales)

  1. corporal, of or relating to the corpus or body, bodywide or systemic

Noun[edit]

corporal m (plural corporales)

  1. corporal (linen cloth)