cos

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See also: Cos, 'cos, coś, coș, and cós

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

cos

  1. (trigonometry) a symbol of the trigonometric function cosine.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the name of the island Cos, whence it was introduced.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cos

  1. A variety of lettuce with long, crisp leaves.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From 'cause, an aphetic form of because.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

cos

  1. (UK) because
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *cosō, from Latin consuō. Compare Daco-Romanian coase, cos.

Verb[edit]

cos (third-person singular present indicative coasi/coase, past participle cusutã)

  1. I sew.

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal cors, from Latin corpus.

Noun[edit]

cos m (plural cossos)

  1. body

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From contraction of preposition con (with) + masculine plural definite article os (the)

Contraction[edit]

cos m pl (masculine co, feminine coa, feminine plural coas)

  1. with the

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • cois (Cois Fharraige)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cos, from Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koks-, whence also Latin coxa (hip).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cos f (genitive coise, nominative plural cosa)

  1. foot
  2. leg

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cos chos gcos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cōs f (genitive cōtis); third declension

  1. whetstone

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cōs cōtēs
genitive cōtis cōtum
dative cōtī cōtibus
accusative cōtem cōtēs
ablative cōte cōtibus
vocative cōs cōtēs

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

cos m

  1. nominative singular of cop
  2. oblique plural of cop

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koks-. Cognate with Latin coxa (hip).

Noun[edit]

cos f

  1. foot
  2. leg

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [1]

Romanian[edit]

Verb[edit]

cos

  1. first-person singular present tense form of coase.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of coase.
  3. third-person plural present tense form of coase.