lino

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of linoleum, probably influenced by -o (diminutive suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lino (uncountable)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, UK, colloquial, informal) Abbreviation of linoleum.
    • 1996 July 20, Malcolm Tippett, “Dogs ...No Way”, aus.jokes, Usenet:
      The third thing was the TORN lino in the kitchen , new puppy found it great fun to tear strips of lino off the floor  .. first you scrabble like crazy with your claws to start a tear , and then you use teeth to tear off a lovely strip of lino to chew . We are still too scared to replace the lino as the next puppy will probably do the same .
    • 2002 October 30, Augie, “Frontline or Advantage for fleas?”, aus.pets, Usenet:
      When we moved here, the people before had dogs, complete with crawling carpet and jumping lino. When we ripped up all the carpet and lino prior to moving in, we also bought half a dozen flea bombs, and bombed UNDER the house.
    • 2010 April 25, George W Frost, “Found this old paper under the lino of a reno”, aus.sport.aussie-rules, Usenet:
      I took up the lino from the kitchen and found this newspaper clipping

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of linoleum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lino n

  1. linoleum

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lino

  1. linocut

Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

From Latin līnum.

Noun[edit]

lino m (plural lini)

  1. flax (plant and fiber)
  2. linen (thread or cloth made from flax fiber)

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possible connection with Latin lētum, dēleō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active linō, present infinitive linere, perfect active lēvī, supine litum

  1. I daub, besmear, anoint

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

līnō

  1. dative singular of līnum
  2. ablative singular of līnum

References[edit]

  • lino in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

From Latin līnum.

Noun[edit]

lino m (plural linos)

  1. linen
  2. flax

Derived terms[edit]