taper

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English taper, from Old English tapor (taper, candle, wick of a lamp), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Latin papyrus (papyrus", used in Mediaeval times to mean "wick of a candle), or of Celtic origin related to Irish tapar (taper), Welsh tampr (a taper, torch). Compare Sanskrit [script?] (tápati, (it) warms, gives out heat; to be hot; to heat). More at tepid.

Noun[edit]

taper (plural tapers)

  1. A slender wax candle; a small lighted wax candle; hence, a small light.
    • ~1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act I, scene I, line 157:
      strike on the tinder, ho!/ Give me a taper.
    • 1913, Paul Laurence Dunbar, The Change
      Love used to carry a bow, you know,
      But now he carries a taper;
      It is either a length of wax aglow,
      Or a twist of lighted paper.
  2. A tapering form; gradual diminution of thickness and/or cross section in an elongated object
    the taper of a spire.
    The legs of the table had a slight taper to them.
  3. A thin stick used for lighting candles, either a wax-coated wick or a slow-burning wooden rod.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

taper (third-person singular simple present tapers, present participle tapering, simple past and past participle tapered)

  1. (transitive) To make thinner or narrower at one end.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 3
      Though true cylinders without — within, the villanous green goggling glasses deceitfully tapered downwards to a cheating bottom.
  2. (intransitive) To diminish gradually.
Derived terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

tape +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

taper (plural tapers)

  1. (weaving) One who operates a tape machine.
  2. Someone who works with tape or tapes.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

taper

  1. present tense of tape

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French taper, from Old French tapper, taper (to tap), of Germanic origin, from Old Frankish *tappōn, *dabbōn (to strike) or from Middle Low German tappen, tapen ("to tap, rap, strike"); both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *dab- (to strike), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰAbʰ- (to beat, strike, stun, be speachless). Related to German tappen (to grope, fumble), Dutch deppen (to dab), Icelandic tappa, tapsa, tæpta (to tap). Related to dab.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

taper

  1. (transitive) to slap, knock, beat
  2. (transitive) to type (use a keyboard or typewriter)
  3. (intransitive) to hit, beat, rap (sur on)
  4. (intransitive) to beat down (of the sun); to go to one's head (of wine etc.)
  5. (intransitive, slang) to stink, pong, reek
  6. (reflexive, slang) to put away (a meal etc.)
  7. (vulgar, slang) to fuck (have sex)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Verb[edit]

taper (gerund tap'thie)

  1. (onomatopoeia) to hit, knock

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

taper

  1. a loser

Inflection[edit]


Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

taper

  1. Indefinite plural of tape

Verb[edit]

taper

  1. Present tense of tape (to lose)
  2. (archaic) present tense of tape (to tape)

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

taper

  1. present tense of tape (to lose)

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Verb[edit]

taper

  1. to throw