angst

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See also: Angst

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Angst or Danish angst; attested since the 19th century in English translations of the works of Freud and Søren Kierkegaard. Initially capitalized (as in German and contemporaneous Danish), the term first began to be written with a lowercase "a" around 1940–44.[1][2][3] The German and Danish terms both derive from Middle High German angest, from Old High German angust, from Proto-Germanic *angustiz; Dutch angst is cognate. Compare Swedish ångest.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

angst (uncountable)

  1. Emotional turmoil; painful sadness.
    • 1979, Peter Hammill, Mirror images
      I've begun to regret that we'd ever met / Between the dimensions. / It gets such a strain to pretend that the change / Is anything but cheap. / With your infant pique and your angst pretensions / Sometimes you act like such a creep.
    • 2007, Martyn Bone, Perspectives on Barry Hannah (page 3)
      Harry's adolescence is theatrical and gaudy, and many of its key scenes have a lurid and camp quality that is appropriate to the exaggerated mood-shifting and self-dramatizing of teen angst.
  2. A feeling of acute but vague anxiety or apprehension often accompanied by depression, especially philosophical anxiety.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

angst (third-person singular simple present angsts, present participle angsting, simple past and past participle angsted)

  1. (informal) To suffer angst; to fret.
    • 2001, Joseph P Natoli, Postmodern Journeys: Film and Culture, 1996-1998
      In the second scene, the camera switches to the father listening, angsting, dying inside, but saying nothing.
    • 2006, Liz Ireland, Three Bedrooms in Chelsea
      She'd never angsted so much about her head as she had in the past twenty-four hours. Why the hell hadn't she just left it alone?

References[edit]

  1. ^ angst” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. ^ angst” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  3. ^ angst” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German angest, from Old High German angust, from Proto-Germanic *angustiz.

Adjective[edit]

angst

  1. afraid, anxious, alarmed

Noun[edit]

angst c (singular definite angsten, not used in plural form)

  1. fear, alarm, apprehension, dread
  2. anxiety
  3. angst

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *angust, from Proto-Germanic *angustiz. Related to Dutch eng (narrow; scary). Cognate with German German Angst.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

angst m (plural angsten, diminutive angstje n)

  1. fear, angst, anxiety

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German (compare German Angst).

Noun[edit]

angst m (definite singular angsten, uncountable)

  1. angst

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

“angst” in The Bokmål Dictionary.