banjo

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See also: Banjo, banjô, and banjō

English[edit]

A bluegrass banjo
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

A corruption of bandore, from the pronunciation of African slaves.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) enPR: băn'jō, IPA(key): /ˈbæn.dʒəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbæn.dʒoʊ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

banjo (plural banjos or banjoes)

  1. A stringed musical instrument (chordophone), usually with a round body, a membrane-like soundboard and a fretted neck, played by plucking or strumming the strings.
    I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee...
  2. Any of various similar musical instruments, such as the Tuvan doshpuluur, with a membrane-like soundboard.
  3. (slang) An object shaped like a banjo, especially a frying pan or a shovel.
  4. (UK, Dagenham) A cul-de-sac with a round end.
    • 1963, Peter Willmott, The Evolution of a Community, page 75:
      They all came back here — we cleared the room and put up tables for the reception — and then we went to another house on the banjo for a "knees-up".
    • 2013, M. C. Dutton, The Godfathers of London:
      Billy Tower lived in the far left house in the banjo that was Dagenham's version of cul de sacs. The trouble was you could be seen from the house and, in the time it took to walk along the Banjo, drugs could be flushed away.
    • 2013, Martin Crookston, Garden Suburbs of Tomorrow?:
      The banjo format is not an unalloyed success these days: kids playing noisily on the quite narrow common green []

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

banjo (third-person singular simple present banjos, present participle banjoing, simple past and past participle banjoed)

  1. To play a banjo.
  2. (transitive, slang, Britain) To beat, to knock down.
    • 1989, Susan S. M. Edwards, Policing 'domestic' Violence: Women, the Law and the State, page 95
      Admitting the assault, the husband said that he had given her a 'banjoing' but that she had asked for it.
    • 1998, "Fergie's world just gets Madar" (Sport), Sunday Mail, Jan 4, 1998
      Madar was turfed out on a final misdemeanour of banjoing one of his teammates in training before a big game
    • 2007, "Return of Smeato, the extraordinary hero", Times Online, Jul 31, 2007
      "Me and other folk were just trying to get the boot in and some other guy banjoed [decked] him”.
  3. (transitive, slang, Britain, military) To shell or attack (a target).
    • 2008, Michael Asher, The Regiment: The Definitive Story of the SAS (page cxxx)
      Riding reported that on the day Mayne had asked for DZ coordinates, their base had been banjoed by the Germans.

References[edit]

  1. ^ John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “banjo”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Further reading[edit]

  • Alice Parkinson, Music (2006), p. 22.

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo n

  1. banjo

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • banjo in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English banjo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑn.joː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ban‧jo

Noun[edit]

banjo m (plural banjo's, diminutive banjootje n)

  1. banjo (stringed instrument)

Descendants[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑnjo/, [ˈbɑnjo̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑnjo
  • Syllabification: ban‧jo

Noun[edit]

banjo

  1. banjo

Declension[edit]

Inflection of banjo (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative banjo banjot
genitive banjon banjojen
partitive banjoa banjoja
illative banjoon banjoihin
singular plural
nominative banjo banjot
accusative nom. banjo banjot
gen. banjon
genitive banjon banjojen
partitive banjoa banjoja
inessive banjossa banjoissa
elative banjosta banjoista
illative banjoon banjoihin
adessive banjolla banjoilla
ablative banjolta banjoilta
allative banjolle banjoille
essive banjona banjoina
translative banjoksi banjoiksi
instructive banjoin
abessive banjotta banjoitta
comitative banjoineen
Possessive forms of banjo (type valo)
possessor singular plural
1st person banjoni banjomme
2nd person banjosi banjonne
3rd person banjonsa

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bɑ̃.ʒo/, /bɑ̃.dʒo/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

banjo m (plural banjos)

  1. banjo

Further reading[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

banjō

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐌽𐌾𐍉

Greenlandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Danish banjo, from English banjo.

Noun[edit]

banjo

  1. banjo

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From English banjo, a corruption of bandore, Spanish bandurria, from Latin pandura, pandurium, a musical instrument of three strings, from Ancient Greek πανδοῦρα (pandoûra, three-stringed lute).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈband͡ʒo]
  • Hyphenation: ban‧jo

Noun[edit]

banjo (first-person possessive banjoku, second-person possessive banjomu, third-person possessive banjonya)

  1. (music) banjo: a stringed musical instrument (chordophone), usually with a round body, a membrane-like soundboard and a fretted neck, played by plucking or strumming the strings.

Alternative forms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo m (invariable)

  1. (music) banjo

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From English banjo, 18th century black American rendition of bandore.

Noun[edit]

banjo m (definite singular banjoen, indefinite plural banjoer, definite plural banjoene)

  1. (music) a banjo

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From English banjo, as above.

Noun[edit]

banjo m (definite singular banjoen, indefinite plural banjoar, definite plural banjoane)

  1. (music) a banjo

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English banjo, from bandore, from Spanish bandurria, from Latin pandūra, from Ancient Greek πανδοῦρα (pandoûra). Doublet of bandura and mandola.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo n (indeclinable)

  1. (music) banjo

Further reading[edit]

  • banjo in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • banjo in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo m (plural banjos)

  1. (music) banjo (a musical instrument)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French banjo.

Noun[edit]

banjo n (plural banjouri)

  1. banjo

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo m (plural banjos or banjoes)

  1. banjo

Further reading[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo c

  1. (music) banjo

Declension[edit]

Declension of banjo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative banjo banjon banjor banjorna
Genitive banjos banjons banjors banjornas

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English banjo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo m (plural banjos or banjoau)

  1. banjo

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
banjo fanjo manjo unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “banjo”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English banjo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

banjo c (plural banjo's, diminutive banjoke)

  1. banjo

Further reading[edit]

  • banjo”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011