bort

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Bort, bört, bőrt, and борть

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

bort (countable and uncountable, plural borts)

  1. Poor-quality diamond, used for industrial cutting or abrasion; a poorly crystallized diamond.
    • 1931, Business Week, Issues 82-94, page 25,
      Bits that would require 4 to 16 carbonadoes are now set with 40 to 80 borts.

Bavarian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wort, from Old High German wort, from Proto-West Germanic *word, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą (word). Cognate with German Wort, English word.

Noun[edit]

bort n

  1. (Sappada) word

References[edit]

  • “bort” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wort, from Old High German wort, from Proto-West Germanic *word, from Proto-Germanic *wurdą (word). Cognate with German Wort, English word.

Noun[edit]

bort n (plural börtar)

  1. (Luserna, Tredici Comuni) word

References[edit]

  • “bort” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First known occurrence of the expression in the Czech language (16th century) was in the sense side (of a gutter or hole). From early Middle High German bord, bort ("side", especially of a ship; originally "a board", "a plank"). This comes from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerH- (cut).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bort m

  1. (nautical) board, side of a ship [16th c.]

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "bort" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, Leda, 2015, →ISBN, page 93.

Further reading[edit]

  • bort in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bort in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse burt, brott, braut, originally an adverbial accusative of the noun braut (way). For the semantic development of the noun, compare English away, German weg (away) (hence Danish væk.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bort

  1. away, off (things, people that are in motion)

See also[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German borde, from Proto-Germanic *burdô (rim, edging), cognate with German Borte. Probably related to *burdą (board).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bort c (singular definite borten, plural indefinite borter)

  1. border, edging, trimming
  2. band, ribbon
Inflection[edit]

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

bor +‎ -t

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbort]
  • Hyphenation: bort

Noun[edit]

bort

  1. accusative singular of bor
    Bort rendeltek.They ordered wine.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse burt, burtu, brott, brottu

Adverb[edit]

bort

  1. away
    bortto pass away
    gifte bort sin dattergive one's daughter away (in marriage)

Derived terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

bort

  1. away

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse burt, burtu, brott, brottu

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bort

  1. away
    bortto pass away

Derived terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

bort

  1. away

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse burt, brott, braut.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

bort

  1. away, off

Verb[edit]

bort

  1. supine of böra.

See also[edit]