brath

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English brath, broth, braith, from Old Norse bráðr ‎(hasty, sudden), from Proto-Germanic *brēþaz ‎(hot, in a hurry, rushed), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrē-, *bʰerē- ‎(steam, vapour), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- ‎(to seethe, toss about, cook). Cognate with Icelandic bráður ‎(quick, hasty, excited), Swedish bråd ‎(hasty, sudden, urgent), Danish bråd ‎(hasty, sudden). Related to breath, brew.

Adjective[edit]

brath ‎(comparative brather or more brath, superlative brathest or most brath)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Hasty; violent; fierce; strong.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English brath, from Old Norse bráð ‎(haste), from Old Norse bráðr ‎(hasty). See above.

Noun[edit]

brath ‎(uncountable)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Violence; fierceness; anger; fury; fit of rage.

Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

brath m ‎(genitive as verbal noun braite, genitive as substantive braith)

  1. verbal noun of braith
  2. perception, feeling, detection
  3. spying, betrayal
  4. expectation
  5. dependence, reliance (with ar ‎(on))
    Tá mé ag brath ort.
    I’m relying on you.
Declension[edit]

Verbal noun:

Substantive:

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
brath bhrath mbrath
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

brath m ‎(genitive singular bratha)

  1. knowledge, information
  2. advantage
  3. betrayal

Derived terms[edit]