dictator

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English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dictātor (a chief magistrate), from dictō (dictate, prescribe), from dīcō (say, speak).

Surface analysis is dictate +‎ -or ((agent)) “one who dictates”.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dictator (plural dictators)

  1. A totalitarian leader of a country, nation, or government
  2. Originally, a magistrate without colleague in republican ancient Rome, who held full executive authority for a term granted by the senate (legislature), typically to conduct a war
  3. A tyrannical boss, or authority figure
  4. A person who dictates text (e.g. letters to a clerk)
  5. A ruler or Führer, the highest level of authority.

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Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dictator m (plural dictatoren or dictators, diminutive dictatortje n)

  1. dictator (bossy senses)

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

dictō (I dictate) +‎ -tor

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dictātor m (genitive dictātōris); third declension

  1. an elected chief magistrate
  2. one who dictates.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative dictātor dictātōrēs
genitive dictātōris dictātōrum
dative dictātōrī dictātōribus
accusative dictātōrem dictātōrēs
ablative dictātōre dictātōribus
vocative dictātor dictātōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

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Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • dictator in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dictator in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “dictator”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • dictator” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to name a person dictator: dictatorem dicere (creare)
    • a dictator appoints a magister equitum: dictator dicit (legit) magistrum equitum
  • dictator in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dictator in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French dictateur, Latin dictator.

Noun[edit]

dictator m (plural dictatori)

  1. dictator

Related terms[edit]