emporium

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See also: Emporium

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin emporium (trading station, market town, market); from Ancient Greek ἐμπόριον (empórion, trading station), from ἔμπορος (émporos, merchant”, “traveller”, literally “incomer), from ἐν (en, in) and πόρος (póros, journey)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emporium (plural emporiums or emporia)

  1. A market place or trading centre, particularly of an ancient city.
    • 2007, John Darwin, After Tamerlane, Penguin 2008, p. 28:
      Only where churchmen congregated or rulers established their emporia—licensed depots for the long-distance trade in luxuries—did any vestiges of urban life survive.
  2. A shop that offers a wide variety of goods, often used facetiously.
    With a name like "The Wine and Spirits Emporium", no wonder the prices are so high.
  3. A department store.
  4. (obsolete) The brain.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἐμπόριον (empórion, trading station), from ἔμπορος (émporos, merchant”, “traveller”, literally “incomer), from ἐν (en, in) and πόρος (póros, journey)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emporium n (genitive emporiī); second declension

  1. emporium

Declension[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative emporium emporia
Genitive emporiī
emporī1
emporiōrum
Dative emporiō emporiīs
Accusative emporium emporia
Ablative emporiō emporiīs
Vocative emporium emporia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

References[edit]

  • emporium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • emporium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • emporium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • emporium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • emporium in Samuel Ball Platner (1929), Thomas Ashby, editor, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, London: Oxford University Press
  • emporium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin emporium (trading station, market town, market); from Ancient Greek ἐμπόριον (empórion, trading station), from ἔμπορος (émporos, merchant", "traveller", literally "incomer"), from ἐν (en, in) and πόρος (póros, journey).

Noun[edit]

emporium n

  1. emporium

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]