emporium

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See also: Emporium

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin emporium (trading station; business district in a city; market town), from Ancient Greek ἐμπόριον (empórion, factory, trading station; market), from ἔμπορος (émporos, merchant, trader; traveller) + -ιον (-ion, suffix forming nouns). ἔμπορος is derived from ἐμ- (em-) (variant of ἐν- (en-, prefix meaning ‘in; within’)) + πόρος (póros, journey; passageway) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to go through; to carry forth)), modelled after ἐν πόρῳ (en pórōi, at sea; en route).[1]

Sense 4 (“the brain”) alludes to the organ as the place where many nerves or nerve impulses meet.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emporium (plural emporiums or emporia)

  1. (also figurative) A city or region which is a major trading centre; also, a place within a city for commerce and trading; a marketplace.
    • 1863, Henry Dawson, The Federalist Chapter 40
      The State itself is penetrated by a large navigable river for more than fifty leagues. The great emporium of its commerce, the great reservoir of its wealth, lies every moment at the mercy of events, and may almost be regarded as a hostage for ignominious compliances with the dictates of a foreign enemy, or even with the rapacious demands of pirates and barbarians.
    • 2007, John Darwin, After Tamerlane, Penguin 2008, p. 28:
      Only where churchmen congregated or rulers established their emporia—licensed depots for the long-distance trade in luxuries—did any vestiges of urban life survive.
  2. (also figurative) A shop that offers a wide variety of goods for sale; a department store; (with a descriptive word) a shop specializing in particular goods.
    With a name like “The Wine and Spirits Emporium”, no wonder the prices are so high.
    • 1919, Saki, Morlvera
      The Olympic Toy Emporium occupied a conspicuous frontage in an important West End street. It was happily named Toy Emporium, because one would never have dreamed of according it the familiar and yet pulse-quickening name of toyshop.
  3. (historical) A business set up to enable foreign traders to engage in commerce in a country; a factory (now the more common term).
  4. (by extension, obsolete) The brain.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin emporium (trading station, market town, market); from Ancient Greek ἐμπόριον (empórion, trading station), from ἔμπορος (émporos, merchant", "traveller", literally "incomer"), from ἐν (en, in) and πόρος (póros, journey).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emporium n (plural emporia or emporiums, diminutive emporiumpje n)

  1. (historical) emporium (trading centre)

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἐμπόριον (empórion, trading station), from ἔμπορος (émporos, merchant”, “traveller”, literally “incomer), from ἐν (en, in) and πόρος (póros, journey)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

emporium n (genitive emporiī or emporī); second declension

  1. emporium

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative emporium emporia
Genitive emporiī
emporī1
emporiōrum
Dative emporiō emporiīs
Accusative emporium emporia
Ablative emporiō emporiīs
Vocative emporium emporia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

References[edit]

  • emporium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • emporium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • emporium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • emporium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • emporium in Samuel Ball Platner (1929) , Thomas Ashby, editor, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, London: Oxford University Press
  • emporium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin emporium (trading station, market town, market); from Ancient Greek ἐμπόριον (empórion, trading station), from ἔμπορος (émporos, merchant", "traveller", literally "incomer"), from ἐν (en, in) and πόρος (póros, journey).

Noun[edit]

emporium n

  1. emporium

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]