fakir

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See also: fakír

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic فَقِير ‎(faqīr, poor man).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fəˈkiɹ/, /fəˈkɪər/, /fɑˈkiɹ/, /ˈfeɪkəɹ/
  • Homophone: faker
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(ɹ)

Noun[edit]

fakir ‎(plural fakirs)

  1. (Islam) A faqir.
  2. (Hindu) An ascetic mendicant, especially one who performs feats of endurance or apparent magic.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The preposterous altruism too! [] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as bad intrinsically as fakirs stabbing themselves or anchorites warping their spines in caves scarcely large enough for a fair-sized dog.
  3. (derogatory) Someone who takes advantage of the gullible through fakery, especially of a spiritual or religious nature.
    • 1905, Eclectic Magazine, Foreign Literature, Science, and Art
      He denounces no one until he has all the damaging facts in hand, very frequently backed up with affidavits. He 'Lawsonized' certain stock jobbers and financial fakirs of London before the Boston advertising man was heard of.
    • 1927, The Rotarian, page 30
      "But a stranger who had come up to the group just at this point, when they were pronouncing the soup delicious, laughed aloud. "'What a set of fools you all are!' he cried. 'This tramp is just a fakir. That stone had nothing to do with the soup."
    • 1994, Michael Barry Miller, Shanghai on the Métro: Spies, Intrigue, and the French Between the Wars, Univ of California Press (ISBN 9780520085190), page 252
      He was, as the undercover agent concluded, a fabulous raconteur or, as one other person summed him up, "a monumental fakir and liar."
    • 2009, Gelett Burgess, The Heart Line: A Drama of San Francisco, Lulu.com (ISBN 9781605433851), page 175
      From what I hear of him he's a fakir, and I won't encourage him in his attempts to get into society at my expense.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic فَقِير ‎(faqīr) ("poor man").

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fakir m ‎(plural fakirs)

  1. fakir (all meanings)

External links[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic فَقِير ‎(faqīr, poor man), probably via Ottoman Turkish فقیر ‎(fakir). Compare fukàra, fukàrluk

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fǎkiːr/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧kir

Noun[edit]

fàkīr m ‎(Cyrillic spelling фа̀кӣр)

  1. faqir
  2. (Hindu) fakir (an ascetic mendicant)
  3. (regional) a destitute man

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • fakir” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • Abdulah Škaljić (1966), Turcizmi u srpskohrvatskom jeziku, Svjetlost: Sarajevo, page 276

Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /facir/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧kir

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic فَقِير ‎(faqīr).

Noun[edit]

fakir ‎(definite accusative fakiri, plural fakirler)

  1. (Hindu) fakir (an ascetic mendicant)

Declension[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fakir (comparative daha fakir, superlative en fakir)

  1. poor, pauper

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]