funeral

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

1437, Borrowing from Middle French funerailles pl (funeral rites), from Medieval Latin fūnerālia (funeral rites), originally neuter plural of Late Latin fūnerālis (having to do with a funeral), from Latin fūnus (funeral, death, corpse), origin unknown, perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰew- (to die). Singular and plural used interchangeably in English until circa 1700. The adjective funereal is first attested 1725, by influence of Middle French funerail, from Latin funereus, from funus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

funeral (plural funerals)

  1. A ceremony to honour and remember a deceased person. Often distinguished from a memorial service by the presence of the body of the deceased.
    No one likes to go to funerals.
  2. (dated, chiefly in the plural) A funeral sermon.
    • South
      Mr. Giles Lawrence preached his funerals.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

A funeral procession in Peru

funeral (not comparable)

  1. (uncommon) Alternative form of funereal
    • 1852, Benson John Lossing, The Pictorial Field-book of the Revolution, page 367:
      All was funeral gloom and hope never whispered its cheering promises there.
    • 1869, William Carleton, Tubber Derg: Or, The Red Well, page 166:
      Indeed I felt it altogether beautiful; and, as the "dying day-hymn stole aloft," the dim sun-beams fell, through a vista of naked motionless trees, upon the coffin, which was borne with a slower and more funeral pace than before, in a manner that threw a solemn and visionary light upon the whole procession.
    • 1888, Plutarch's Lives: The Translation Called Dryden's - Volume 5, page 153:
      There was something dramatic and theatrical in the very funeral ceremonies with which Demetrius was honored.
    • 1998, Lisa M. Klein, The Exemplary Sidney and the Elizabethan Sonneteer, page 15:
      The very funeral pageantry disguised behind-the-scenes struggles for control over Sidney's image.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • funeral in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • funeral at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fūnerālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

funeral (masculine and feminine plural funerals)

  1. funerary, funeral
    Synonyms: funerari, fúnebre

Noun[edit]

funeral m (plural funerals)

  1. (often in the plural) funeral (ceremony)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin fūnerālis, from Latin funus.

Noun[edit]

funeral m (plural funerais)

  1. funeral (ceremony to honour and bury a deceased person)

Adjective[edit]

funeral m, f (plural funerais, comparable)

  1. funeral (relating to or similar in style or atmosphere to a funeral)

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin fūnerālis, from Latin funus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

funeral (plural funerales)

  1. funerary, funeral
    Synonyms: funerario, fúnebre

Noun[edit]

funeral m (plural funerales)

  1. (often in the plural) funeral (ceremony)

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]