grouse

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)
The calls of several black grouse (Lyrurus tetrix) recorded in Banchory, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, UK.

Etymology 1[edit]

Attested in the 1530s, as grows ("moorhen"), a plural used collectively. The origin of the noun is unknown;[1] the following derivations have been suggested:

The verb is derived from the noun.[3]

Noun[edit]

grouse (countable and uncountable, plural grouse or grouses)

  1. (countable) Any of various game birds of the subfamily Tetraoninae which inhabit temperate and subarctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere; specifically, the red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) native to heather moorland on the British Isles. [from 1530s]
    (red grouse): Synonyms: moorbird, moorcock, moorfowl
    • 1531 January, “XXI. Extracts from a MS. Dated ‘apud Eltham, mense Jan. 22 Hen. VIII.’ Communicated to the Society by Owen Salusbury Brereton, Esq; Read at the Society of Antiquaries, April 9, 1772.”, in Archaeologia: Or, Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity, volume III, London: [] Society [of Antiquaries of London]; and by Messieurs Whiston, White, Robson, Baker and Leigh, and Brown, published 1775, OCLC 220073875, page 157:
      Among fowls for the table [of King Henry VIII] are crocards, winders, runners, grows, and peions, but neither Turky or Guiney-fowl.
    • 1630s, Benjamin Jonson [i.e., Ben Jonson], “A Tale of a Tub. A Comedy []”, in The Workes of Benjamin Jonson. The Second Volume. [] (Second Folio), London: [] Richard Meighen, published 1640, OCLC 51546498, Act II, scene i, page 70:
      Looke to 't, young growſe: Ile lay it on, and ſure; / Take 't off who's wull.
      Used as an insult.
  2. (uncountable) The flesh or meat of this bird eaten as food.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

grouse (third-person singular simple present grouses, present participle grousing, simple past and past participle groused)

  1. (intransitive) To hunt or shoot grouse.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

The origin of the verb is uncertain; it is possibly borrowed from Norman groucier, from Old French groucier, grousser (to grumble, murmur) [and other forms] (whence grutch (to complain; to murmur) and grouch). The further etymology is unknown, but it may be derived from Frankish *grōtijan (to make cry, scold, rebuke) or of onomatopoeic origin.[4]

The noun is derived from the verb.[5]

Verb[edit]

grouse (third-person singular simple present grouses, present participle grousing, simple past and past participle groused)

  1. (intransitive, originally military slang, informal) To complain or grumble. [from late 19th c.]
    • 1890, Kipling, The Young British Soldier
      If you're cast for fatigue by a sergeant unkind,
      Don't grouse like a woman, nor crack on, nor blind;
      Be handy and civil, and then you will find
      That it's beer for the young British soldier.
    • 1926, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Land of Mist[1]:
      Grouse away!" he growled. "If grousin' made a man happy, you'd be the champion."
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

grouse (plural grouses)

  1. (informal) A cause for complaint; a grumble. [from early 20th c.]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Origin uncertain;[6] possibly from British dialectal groosh (excellent, very good) (Lothian (Scotland)),[7] grosh (northeast Lancashire) and groshy (having thriving vegetation; juicy and tender; of weather: good for vegetation, rainy) (Lancashire, Yorkshire),[8] grushie (having thriving vegetation) (Scotland);[9] from Scots groosh (excellent, very good) (Lothian, obsolete),[10] grush (obsolete), grushie, grushy (growing healthily or lushly; excellent, very good) (both archaic), from gross (lacking refinement, coarse; fat; large) + -ie (suffix meaning ‘rather, somewhat’).[11]

Adjective[edit]

grouse (comparative grouser, superlative grousest)

  1. (Australia, New Zealand, slang) Excellent. [from 1920s]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:excellent
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:bad
    I had a grouse day.    That food was grouse.
    • 1991, Tim Winton, Cloudstreet, Scribner Paperback Fiction 2002, page 182,
      They were the grousest ladies she′d ever met.
    • 1998 July 23, Stujo, “SPOILER FTF - questions”, in aus.tv.x-files, Usenet[2]:
      Not a question but the gag of Mulder pissing on the ID4 poster was grouse.
    • 2003 October 4, Leeroy, “FS Ultralight Aircraft”, in aus.motorcycles, Usenet[3]:
      I know, but I moved from riding bikes to flying and it is a great move. All riders without a fear of heights I know that flew with me thought it was grouse- and there are no coppers or speed limits up there.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ grouse, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1900.
  2. ^ grouse1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ grouse, v.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1900.
  4. ^ Compare “grouse, v.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1900; “grouse2, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present; “grutch, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1900.
  5. ^ Compare “grouse, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1933; “grouse2, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  6. ^ Compare “grouse, adj.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1972; “grouse3, adj.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  7. ^ “GROOSH, adj.” in Joseph Wright, editor, The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume II (D–G), London: Published by Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1900, →OCLC, page 738, column 1.
  8. ^ “GROSHY, adj.” in Joseph Wright, editor, The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume II (D–G), London: Published by Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1900, →OCLC, page 739, column 1.
  9. ^ “GRUSHIE, adj.” in Joseph Wright, editor, The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume II (D–G), London: Published by Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1900, →OCLC, page 750, column 2.
  10. ^ John Jamieson (1825), “GROOSH”, in Supplement to the Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language: [], volume I (A–J), Edinburgh: [] University Press; for W[illiam] & C[harles] Tait, []; London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, OCLC 863495133, page 515, column 2.
  11. ^ GRUSHIE, -Y, adj.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–, OCLC 57069714, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC; “-IE, suff.”, in The Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries, 2004–, OCLC 57069714, reproduced from W[illiam] Grant and D[avid] D. Murison, editors, The Scottish National Dictionary, Edinburgh: Scottish National Dictionary Association, 1931–1976, →OCLC.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]