lod

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Lod, LoD, LOD, loď, lód, lóð, and löd

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

lod (plural lods)

  1. (statistics, initialism) Logarithm of odds; A measure of likelihood calculated by taking the log of the ratio of the probability of a hypothesis being true given the observed data over the probablity that the hypothesis is false.
    • 1999, Jurg Ott, Analysis of Human Genetic Linkage, ISBN 0801861403, page 66:
      Some computer programs furnish p-values rather than maximum lod scores.
    • 2001, Anatoly Ruvinsky & J. Sampson, The Genetics of the Dog, ISBN 0851990789, page 336:
      Markers were analysed in decreasing order of informativeness; a marker was only added to the map when it could be localized to a unique interval with a lod score of >= 3.0.
    • 2004, T. Strachan & Andrew P. Read, Human Molecular Genetics 3, ISBN 0815341849, page 406:
      Note that only recombinantion fractions between 0 and 0.5 are meaningful, and that all lod scores are zero at (theta)=0.5 (because they are then measuring the ratio of two identical probabilities, and log10(1)=0).

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German lōt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lod n (singular definite loddet, plural indefinite lodder)

  1. plumb bob
  2. lead (plummet to measure depth of water)
  3. sinker (weight used in fishing)
  4. lot (weight unit). A Danish lod was 15.6 grams. In this sense the plural is lod.
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hlutr. Compare Old English hlot (English lot).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lod n, c (singular definite loddet or lodden, plural indefinite lodder)

  1. ticket n
  2. lot, prize n
  3. fate, lot c
  4. portion, share c
  5. lot, plot c

Etymology 3[edit]

See lodde (to solder).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lod

  1. imperative of lodde

Etymology 4[edit]

See lade (to let, leave, have).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lod

  1. past tense of lade

Further reading[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

lod

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ledъ. Cognate with Upper Sorbian lód, Polish lód, Czech led, Russian лёд (ljod), Old Church Slavonic ледъ (ledŭ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lod m (diminutive lodk)

  1. ice (water in frozen form)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • lod in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • lod in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lod

  1. first-person and second-person singular preterite absolute of téit

·lod

  1. first-person and second-person singular preterite conjunct of téit

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lod
also llod after a proclitic
lod
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
lod
also llod after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ledъ

Noun[edit]

lod m

  1. ice

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish lodh, from Middle Low German lot, from Proto-Germanic *laudą. Cognate with German Lot, English lead

Noun[edit]

lod n

  1. a plumb bob, a plummet, a weight (hanging)
    1. a tool used to determine the depth of water
    2. a tool used in construction to find a vertical line
    3. a weight used to power a clock
    4. a weight used in a loom
    5. a weight used in a steelyard balance
    6. a piece of metal used to heat a (non-electric) flat iron
  2. solder (metal used in soldering)
  3. a lot; an old weight unit corresponding to 1/30 or 1/32 pound

Declension[edit]

Declension of lod 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lod lodet lod loden
Genitive lods lodets lods lodens

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]