longitudinal

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English longitudinal, from Latin longitūdin-, oblique stem of longitūdō (length, longitude), equivalent to longitude +‎ -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

longitudinal (not comparable)

  1. Relating to length, or to longitude.
    Antonym: transverse
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. Running in the direction of the long axis of a body.
    • 1960 November, “New electric multiple-units for British Railways: Glasgow Suburban”, in Trains Illustrated, page 660:
      The units have transverse seats, two and three astride the passageway with single or double longitudinal seats alongside the two entrance vestibules in each car.
    • 2008, Youlian Hong, Roger Bartlett, editors, Routledge Handbook of Biomechanics and Human Movement Science, Routledge, →ISBN, page 165:
      The third rotation is about the longitudinal axis of the thigh.
    • 2023 February 22, Paul Stephen, “TfL reveals first of new B23s for Docklands Light Railway”, in RAIL, number 977, page 12:
      Unlike the older trains, the new units have walk-through carriages and longitudinal rather than transverse seating.
  3. Forward and/or backward, relative to some defined direction.
  4. (sciences and social sciences, of a study) Sampling data over time rather than merely once.
    Antonym: cross-sectional
    longitudinal studies
    • 2010 March 1, Don Peck, “How a New Jobless Era Will Transform America”, in The Atlantic[1]:
      Examining national longitudinal data, Mossakowski has found that people who were unemployed for long periods in their teens or early 20s are far more likely to develop a habit of heavy drinking (five or more drinks in one sitting) by the time they approach middle age.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

longitudinal (plural longitudinals)

  1. Any longitudinal piece, as in shipbuilding etc.
  2. (rail transport) A railway sleeper lying parallel with the rail.

Translations[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin longitūdō, longitūdinis (whence longitude) + -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

longitudinal (feminine longitudinale, masculine plural longitudinaux, feminine plural longitudinales)

  1. longitudinal (relating to length; running in the direction of the long axis of a body)
  2. longitudinal (relating to longitude)
    Coordinate term: latitudinal
  3. longitudinal (sampling data over time rather than merely once)
    Coordinate term: transversal

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French longitudinal.

Adjective[edit]

longitudinal m or n (feminine singular longitudinală, masculine plural longitudinali, feminine and neuter plural longitudinale)

  1. longitudinal

Declension[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lonxitudiˈnal/ [lõŋ.xi.t̪u.ð̞iˈnal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: lon‧gi‧tu‧di‧nal

Adjective[edit]

longitudinal m or f (masculine and feminine plural longitudinales)

  1. longitudinal (relating to length or longitude)
  2. longitudinal (sampling data over time)
    • 2001, Psicología infantil, Grupo Planeta (GBS) →ISBN, page 80
      El número de años que requiere un estudio longitudinal puede variar considerablemente.
      The number of years required by a longitudinal study may vary considerably.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]