mago

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See also: Mago

Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ma‧go

Etymology 1[edit]

From Spanish mago, from Latin magus, from Ancient Greek μάγος (mágos).

Noun[edit]

mago

  1. the Magi; the wise men that met and gave gifts to the baby Jesus at the Epiphany (traditionally considered to be three in number and sometimes named Melchior, Caspar and Balthazar, but in fact unknown in number)

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare mawmag

Noun[edit]

mago

  1. the Philippine tarsier (Carlito syrichta)

Hausa[edit]

Noun[edit]

mago m (possessed form magon)

  1. Cream-colored horse.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin magus, from Ancient Greek μάγος (mágos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mago m (plural maghi)

  1. magician, wizard
  2. fortuneteller
  3. conjurer, juggler

Adjective[edit]

mago (feminine singular maga, masculine plural maghi, feminine plural maghe)

  1. magic

Related terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mago

  1. Rōmaji transcription of まご

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

magō

  1. dative and ablative singular of magus

References[edit]

  • mago in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mago in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mago in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • mago in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑ.ɡo/, [ˈmɑ.ɣo]

Noun[edit]

mago m

  1. Alternative form of magu

Old High German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *magō, from Proto-Germanic *magô, whence also Old Saxon mago, Old English maga, Old Norse magi.

Noun[edit]

mago m

  1. stomach
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle High German: mage
  • Italian: magone
  • Venetian: magon

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mago m

  1. poppy
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle High German: mage

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
magos

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old Portuguese mago, from Latin magus, from Ancient Greek μάγος (mágos), from Old Iranian.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mago m (feminine singular maga, masculine plural magos, feminine plural magas, comparable)

  1. enchanting

Noun[edit]

mago m (plural magos)

  1. (Christianity, usually capitalized) Magi
  2. magician, sorcerer
  3. magus

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin magus[1], from Ancient Greek μάγος (mágos). Cf. also mego.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɡo/, [ˈmaɣo]
  • Hyphenation: ma‧go

Adjective[edit]

mago (feminine singular maga, masculine plural magos, feminine plural magas)

  1. magician (attributive)

Noun[edit]

mago m (plural magos)

  1. magician, sorcerer
  2. Magi

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]