millennium

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See also: Millennium

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mīllennium, from Latin mīllennis (1000-year) + -ium (forming abstract nouns).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mɪˈlɛnɪəm/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

millennium (plural millennia or millenniums)

  1. A period of time consisting of one thousand years.
    Coordinate terms: annum, biennium, triennium, quadrennium, quinquennium, sexennium, septennium, octennium, novennium, decennium, vicennium, tricennium, centennium, quincentennium, decamillennium, centimillennium, millionennium
    • 1968, Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, 2nd edition, London: Fontana Press, published 1993, page 23:
      But these seekers, too, are saved - by virtue of the inherited symbolic aids of society, the rites of passage, the grace-yielding sacraments, given to mankind of old by the redeemers and handed down through millenniums.
    • 2013, Al Gore, The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change[1], New York: Random House, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 37:
      The first known man-made tools, including spear points and axes, were associated with a hunting and gathering pattern that lasted, according to anthropologists, almost 200 millennia.
    • 2013 March 24, Dan Pearson, The Guardian:
      Magnolias are some of the most primitive of our flowering trees, and fossils dating back millennia prove that they have had little need to evolve.
  2. (Christianity) The period of one thousand years during which Christ will reign on earth (according to Millenarianist interpretations).
    • 1888, C. I. Scofield, “The Seven Dispensations”, in Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth (2 Tim. 2:15): Ten Outline Studies of The More Important Divisions of Scripture[2], Second edition (Religion), Philadelphia, Penn.: Philadelphia School of the Bible, published 1923, →OCLC, page 25:
      After the purifying judgments which attended the personal return of Christ to the Earth, He will reign over restored Israel and over the earth for one thousand years. This is the period commonly called the Millennium. The seat of His power will be Jerusalem, and the saints, including the saved of the Dispensation of Grace, viz., the Church, will be associated with Him in His glory.
    • 1911, Saki, “Tobermory”, in The Chronicles of Clovis:
      An archangel ecstatically proclaiming the Millennium, and then finding that it clashed unpardonably with Henley and would have to be indefinitely postponed, could hardly have felt more crestfallen than Cornelius Appin at the reception of his wonderful achievement.
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society, published 2012, page 137:
      the end of the world would be heralded by a series of spectacular and symbolic events […]. According to most commentators, this millennium had already begun.
    • 2011, Norman Davies, Vanished Kingdoms, Penguin, published 2012, page 117:
      Conrad's later years unfolded in the shadow of the coming Millennium, when the end of the world was forecast.
  3. A period of universal happiness, peace or prosperity; a utopia.
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Folio Society, published 2008, page 318:
      But the aggressive members of society are always tending to become bullies, robbers, and swindlers; and no one believes that such a state of things as we now live in is the millennium.
  4. (with definite article) The year in which one period of one thousand years ends and another begins, especially the year 2000.
    A huge fireworks display was put on in Sydney to celebrate the millennium.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /milɛniɔm/, [miˈlɛnˀiɔm]

Noun[edit]

millennium n (singular definite millenniet, plural indefinite millennier)

  1. millennium

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mīllennium.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌmiˈlɛ.ni.ʏm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mil‧len‧ni‧um

Noun[edit]

millennium n (plural millennia, diminutive milleniumtje n)

  1. millennium
    Synonym: jaarduizend

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

From mīlle and annus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mīllennium n (genitive mīllenniī or mīllennī); second declension

  1. millennium

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mīllennium mīllennia
Genitive mīllenniī
mīllennī1
mīllenniōrum
Dative mīllenniō mīllenniīs
Accusative mīllennium mīllennia
Ablative mīllenniō mīllenniīs
Vocative mīllennium mīllennia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

millennium n (definite singular millenniet, indefinite plural millennier, definite plural millennia or millenniene)

  1. millennium

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

millennium n (definite singular millenniet, indefinite plural millennium, definite plural millennia)

  1. millennium

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

millennium n

  1. a millennium, a period of one thousand years

Declension[edit]

Declension of millennium 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative millennium millenniet millennier millennierna
Genitive millenniums millenniets millenniers millenniernas

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]