placebo

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See also: Placebo

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English placebo, from Latin placēbō (I will please), the first-person singular future active indicative of placeō (I please).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pləˈsiː.bəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /pləˈsi.boʊ/
  • Rhymes: -iːbəʊ
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

placebo (plural placebos or placeboes)

  1. (medicine) A dummy medicine containing no active ingredients; an inert treatment. [from 18th c.]
    • 2010, Edzard Ernst, The Guardian, 22 Feb 2010:
      The acid test, I thought, was whether homeopathic remedies behave differently from placebos when submitted to clinical trials.
    • 2021 March 8, Jane E. Brody, “Medical Marijuana Is Not Regulated as Most Medicines Are”, in The New York Times[1]:
      The trials overall showed some but limited effectiveness, and in one of the largest and longest trials, the placebo performed better in treating spasticity, pain and bladder dysfunction, Dr. Bowling wrote.
  2. (Roman Catholicism) The vespers sung in the office for the dead. [from 13th c.]
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 349:
      There the placebo, the office for the dead, was sung, and a vigil kept throughout the night.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

placebo n

  1. placebo (dummy medicine containing no active ingredients)

Further reading[edit]

  • placebo in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin placēbō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌplaːˈseː.boː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pla‧ce‧bo

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebo's)

  1. placebo
  2. (obsolete) sycophant

Derived terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from Latin placēbō (I will please), the first-person singular future active indicative of placeō (I please).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /plaˈt͡sebo/
  • Hyphenation: pla‧ce‧bo
  • Rhymes: -ebo

Noun[edit]

placebo (accusative singular placebon, plural placeboj, accusative plural placebojn)

  1. (medicine) placebo, dummy drug

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin placēbō.

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebos)

  1. placebo

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

placebo (plural placebos)

  1. placebo

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

placebo m (invariable)

  1. (pharmacology, figuratively) placebo

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

placēbō

  1. first-person singular future active indicative of placeō

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin placēbo, the first-person singular future active indicative of placeō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

placebo (plural placeboes)

  1. (Christianity) The vespers sung in the office for the dead.
    • a. 1380, John Wycliffe, Of feyned contemplatif lif, of ſong, of þe ordynal of ſalisbury, & of bodely almes & worldly byſyneſse of preſtis; hou bi þes foure þe fend lettiþ hem fro prechynge of þe gospel[2]:
      Þan were matynys & maſse & euen ſong, placebo & dirige & comendacion & matynes of oure lady ordeyned of ſynful men, to be ſongen wiþ heiȝe criynge to lette men fro þe ſentence & vnderſtondynge of þat þat was þus ſongen, & to maken men wery & vndiſpoſid to ſtudie goddis lawe for akyng of hedis []
      Then there were matins, mass, evensong, placebo, dirges, commendations, and matins of Our Lady, which originated from sinful men, to be sung with high-pitched shrieking to keep people from the meaning and understanding of that which was sung, as to make men weary and unsuited to study God's law because of headaches []
  2. Talk for buttering someone up, making them sycophantic or pleasing them.
  3. A representation or exemplar of adulation or sycophancy.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: placebo

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Latin placēbo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

placebo n (indeclinable)

  1. (medicine) placebo

Further reading[edit]

  • placebo in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • placebo in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pla.ˈse.bu/
  • Hyphenation: pla‧ce‧bo

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebos)

  1. (medicine) placebo (a dummy medicine containing no active ingredients)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French placebo

Noun[edit]

placebo n (uncountable)

  1. placebo

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From medical New Latin placēbō, from Latin placēbō (literally I will please).

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebos)

  1. placebo