placebo

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See also: Placebo

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English placebo, from Latin placēbō (I will please), the first-person singular future active indicative of placeō (I please).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pləˈsiːbəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /pləˈsiboʊ/
  • Rhymes: -iːbəʊ
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

placebo (plural placebos or placeboes)

  1. (medicine) A dummy medicine containing no active ingredients; an inert treatment. [from 18th c.]
    • 2010, Edzard Ernst, The Guardian, 22 Feb 2010:
      The acid test, I thought, was whether homeopathic remedies behave differently from placebos when submitted to clinical trials.
  2. (Roman Catholicism) The vespers sung in the office for the dead. [from 13th c.]
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 349:
      There the placebo, the office for the dead, was sung, and a vigil kept throughout the night.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin placēbō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌplaːˈseː.boː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pla‧ce‧bo

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebo's)

  1. placebo
  2. (obsolete) sycophant

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin placēbō.

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebos)

  1. placebo

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

placebo (plural placebos)

  1. placebo

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin

Noun[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

placebo m (invariable)

  1. (pharmacology, figuratively) placebo

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

placēbō

  1. first-person singular future active indicative of placeō

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin placēbo, the first-person singular future active indicative of placeō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

placebo (plural placeboes)

  1. (Christianity) The vespers sung in the office for the dead.
    • a. 1380, John Wycliffe, Of feyned contemplatif lif, of ſong, of þe ordynal of ſalisbury, & of bodely almes & worldly byſyneſse of preſtis; hou bi þes foure þe fend lettiþ hem fro prechynge of þe gospel[1]:
      Þan were matynys & maſse & euen ſong, placebo & dirige & comendacion & matynes of oure lady ordeyned of ſynful men, to be ſongen wiþ heiȝe criynge to lette men fro þe ſentence & vnderſtondynge of þat þat was þus ſongen, & to maken men wery & vndiſpoſid to ſtudie goddis lawe for akyng of hedis []
      Then there were matins, mass, evensong, placebo, dirges, commendations, and matins of Our Lady, which originated from sinful men, to be sung with high-pitched shrieking to keep people from the meaning and understanding of that which was sung, as to make men weary and unsuited to study God's law because of headaches []
  2. Talk for buttering someone up, making them sycophantic or pleasing them.
  3. A representation or exemplar of adulation or sycophancy.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: placebo

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pla.ˈse.bu/
  • Hyphenation: pla‧ce‧bo

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebos)

  1. (medicine) placebo (a dummy medicine containing no active ingredients)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin

Noun[edit]

placebo m (plural placebos)

  1. placebo