pram

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See also: Pram, PRAM, pråm, and прам

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Barnevogn2.jpg

Clipping of perambulator.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pram (plural prams)

  1. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) A small vehicle, usually covered, in which a newborn baby is pushed around in a lying position.
    Synonyms: (US) baby carriage, perambulator
    Coordinate terms: baby buggy, pushchair, pusher, stroller
    • 1975, Margaret Drabble, The Realms of Gold, 1977, page 127,
      Janet Bird née Ollerenshaw was pushing her pram along Tockley High Street.
    • 2006, Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale, unnumbered page,
      For a start the pram was heavier than it appeared, and also they were pulling it along very uneven ground. The edge of the field was slightly banked which tilted the pram at an angle.
    • 2012, Ramsey Campbell, Dark Companions, page 233,
      Stepping over her, he unbuttoned the pram′s apron and pulled it back.
      At first he couldn′t make out what the pram contained. He had to crane himself over, holding his body back from the obscuring light. The pram was full of groceries—cabbage, sprouts, potatoes.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

The Optimist, a typical modern pram used to train children to sail.

From Dutch praam (a flat-bottomed boat), from Middle Dutch praem, from Middle Low German prām, from Old Czech *prám, from Proto-Slavic *pormъ. Doublet of farm.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pram (plural prams)

  1. (nautical, historical) A flat-bottomed barge used on shallow shores to convey cargo to and from ships that cannot enter the harbour.
  2. (nautical, historical) A similar barge used as platform for cannons in shallow waters which seagoing warships cannot enter.
  3. A type of dinghy with a flat bow.
    • 1979 August, F. M. Paulson, Car-topable Craft, Field & Stream, page 50,
      Although the pram, like the johnboat, has a squared-off bow as well as stern, the bow lines on the pram will be narrower than those encountered on a johnboat.
    • 1994, Dave Hughes, Fly Fishing Basics, unnumbered page,
      Nothing can beat the simple pleasure of paddling a pram around on a foggy dawn, probing pad flats, stumps and fallen logs for lurking bass.
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Deverbal of pramen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pram m (plural prammen, diminutive prammetje n)

  1. (colloquial, vulgar) A boob, a tit.
    Synonyms: borst, jetser, mem, tiet
  2. (obsolete) A breast of a breastfeeding woman or a teat of a suckling female.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse prámr, from Middle Low German prām, from Old Czech *prám, from Proto-Slavic *pormъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pram m (definite singular prammen, indefinite plural prammar, definite plural prammane)

  1. a rowboat without a keel, a pram
  2. a barge

References[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *pormъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /prâm/
  • Hyphenation: pram

Noun[edit]

prȁm m (Cyrillic spelling пра̏м)

  1. (historical, seafaring) ferry
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From prȁmēn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prȃm m (Cyrillic spelling пра̑м)

  1. lock, tuft
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • pram” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • pram” in Hrvatski jezični portal