ramp

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Ramp

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹæmp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æmp

Etymology 1[edit]

From French rampe, back-formation of Old French ramper, from Frankish *rampōn, *hrampōn (to contract oneself), from Proto-Germanic *hrimpaną.

Akin to Old English hrimpan (to wrinkle, rimple, rumple), Old High German rimpfan (German rümpfen (to wrinkle up)). Compare Danish rimpe (to fold" (archaic), "to baste), Icelandic rimpa. More at rimple.

Noun[edit]

ramp (plural ramps)

  1. An inclined surface that connects two levels; an incline.
  2. An interchange, a road that connects a freeway to a surface street or another freeway.
  3. (aviation) A mobile staircase that is attached to the doors of an aircraft at an airport.
  4. (aviation) A large parking area in an airport for aircraft, for loading and unloading or for storage (see also apron).
  5. (aviation) A surface inside the air intake of a supersonic aircraft which adjusts in position to allow for efficient shock wave compression of incoming air at a wide range of different Mach numbers.
  6. (skating) A construction used to do skating tricks, usually in the form of part of a pipe.
  7. A scale of values.
    • 2003, Julio Sanchez, ‎Maria P. Canton, The PC Graphics Handbook (page 915)
      The RGB model uses the color component of light sources in order to produce more realistic and pleasant results. Internal color representations are always based on a palette-based color ramp.
    • 2013, Sam Kauffmann, ‎Ashley Kennedy, Avid Editing: A Guide for Beginning and Intermediate Users (page 40)
      We have created a volume ramp. Play the section in the Timeline and listen to the volume change.
  8. A speed bump. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  9. (slang) An act of violent robbery.
  10. (Australia, slang) A search, conducted by authorities, of a prisoner or a prisoner's cell.
  11. (obsolete) A leap or bound.
  12. A concave bend at the top or cap of a railing, wall, or coping; a romp.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ramp (third-person singular simple present ramps, present participle ramping, simple past and past participle ramped)

  1. To behave violently; to rage.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter XII, p. 196, [1]
      Mick raged and ramped at the barred door till his voice failed,
  2. (slang, transitive) To rob violently.
  3. (Australia, slang, transitive) To search a prisoner or a prisoner's cell.
  4. (obsolete, intransitive) To spring; to leap; to bound, rear, or prance; to move swiftly or violently.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. [], London: [] [John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938, book I, canto V, stanza 28:
      Their bridles they would champe, / And trampling the fine element would fiercely rampe.
    • 1911, G. K. Chesterton, “The Sign of the Broken Sword”, in The Innocence of Father Brown:
      I’ve seen a ramping equestrian statue of General St. Clare on the Embankment.
    • 1950, C. S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
      The shield was the colour of silver and across it there ramped a red lion, as bright as a ripe strawberry at the moment when you pick it.
  5. (obsolete, intransitive) To climb, like a plant; to creep up.
    • 1691, John Ray, The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation. [], London: [] Samuel Smith, [], OCLC 1179804186:
      With claspers and tendrils, they [plants] catch hold, [] and so ramping upon trees, [] they mount up to a great height.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To stand in a rampant position.
    • 1484, Thomas Malory, “Book Nine: The historye of La cote male tayle, Chapter 1”, in Le Morte d'Arthur:
      And that lyon gaped wyde and came vpon hym raumppynge to haue slayne hym.
  7. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause to) change value, often at a steady rate.
    • 2007, Sean Meyn, Control Techniques for Complex Networks (page 285)
      If Q(t) < qp then primary generation ramps up at maximal rate, subject to the constraint that Q(t) does not exceed this threshold.
    • 2011, Sheng Liu, Yong Liu, Modeling and Simulation for Microelectronic Packaging Assembly
      The forces are ramped down gradually to ensure that element removal has a smooth effect on the model.
  8. To adapt a piece of iron to the woodwork of a gate.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

ramp - Allium tricoccum

See ramson.

Noun[edit]

ramp (plural ramps)

  1. An American plant, Allium tricoccum, related to the onion; a wild leek.
    • 2006, Su Clauson-Wicker, Off the Beaten Path West Virginia, volume 6:
      A ramp is a potently flavored wild scallion, a vegetable with staying power.
  2. (Appalachia) A promiscuous man or woman.
  3. (Appalachia, derogatory) A worthless person.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

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Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch ramp (misfortune). Related to rimpel (wrinkle). In the 19th century, the grammatical gender of the word was a matter of debate. It was finally standardized as feminine, departing from its historical masculine gender.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ramp f (plural rampen, diminutive rampje n)

  1. disaster, catastrophe
    • Mensen wensen geluk en welvaart en verafschuwen ongeluk en rampen
      People wish happiness and prosperity and abhor mishap and disasters
  2. an accident
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French rampe, back-formation of Old French ramper, from Frankish *rampōn, *hrampōn (to contract oneself).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ramp f (plural rampen, diminutive rampje n)

  1. a ramp
  2. a driveway
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from English ramp, from French rampe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ramp m (plural ramps, diminutive rampje n)

  1. (skating) A construction to do skating tricks, usually in the form of one half of a pipe, a half-pipe.

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ramp

  1. indefinite accusative singular of rampur

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to rimpel (wrinkle).

Noun[edit]

ramp m

  1. epilepsy, (human) cramp
  2. bird claw disease, bird cramp
  3. disaster, misfortune

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: ramp

Further reading[edit]

  • ramp”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ramp c

  1. a ramp (inclined surface connecting two levels)
  2. a row of spotlights (at the front of a stage, e.g. footlights)
  3. (by extension) (the front of) a stage
  4. a missile launch platform

Declension[edit]

Declension of ramp 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ramp rampen ramper ramperna
Genitive ramps rampens rampers rampernas

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]