quin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Quin, quin-, and -quin

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

quin (plural quins)

  1. (informal) A quintuplet.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

quin (plural quins)

  1. A European scallop, Pecten opercularis, used as food.
    • 1973, N. L. Tranter, Population since the industrial revolution (page 104)
      Similarly the stocks of the free-living scallops and quins, which are caught by trawling, are threatened by over-fishing to supply the market for canned or frozen luxury sea-foods.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan, from Latin quinam.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

quin (feminine quina, masculine plural quins, feminine plural quines)

  1. (interrogative) which, what
  2. what a

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

quin

  1. (Quebec, colloquial) (surprise, giving someone something) alternative form of tiens

Ido[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

quin

  1. (interrogative) whom (plural) (object)

Usage notes[edit]

To ask for a subject, use qui instead.


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From instrumental quī + ne.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

quīn (not comparable)

  1. (usually with present indicative) How not?, Why not?
    Quin tu taces?
    Why do you not keep quiet?
  2. without
    Numquam egredior quin conspicer.
    I never go out without being seen.
  3. even
    Quin et bellorum omnium eventus ante praesensit.
    And he even predicted beforehand the outcomes of all his wars.

References[edit]

  • quin in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • quin in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • quin in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to devote every spare moment to...; to work without intermission at a thing: nullum tempus intermittere, quin (also ab opere, or ad opus)
    • to be hardly able to restrain one's tears: vix mihi tempero quin lacrimem
    • to be hardly able to restrain one's tears: vix me contineo quin lacrimem
    • to make all possible haste to..: nullam moram interponere, quin (Phil. 10. 1. 1)

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan, from Latin quinam (who, which). Cognate with Catalan quin and with Franco-Provençal quint from a merging of Latin quinam and quantus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kin/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

quin m (feminine singular quina, masculine plural quins, feminine plural quinas)

  1. (interrogative) which
    Quinas veituras son las teunas ?
    Which cars are yours?
  2. (interrogative) what
    Quina ora es ?
    What time is it?
  3. (exclamative) what
    Quina catastròfa !
    What a catastrophe!

Synonyms[edit]

  • qual (for animate objects)
  • que (for inanimate objects)

Derived terms[edit]