seep

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See also: Seep

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of sipe, from Middle English *sipen, from Old English sipian, from Proto-Germanic *sipōną, derivative of *sīpaną (compare Middle Dutch sīpen (to drip), archaic German seifen (to trickle blood)), from Proto-Indo-European *seyb-, *sib- (to pour out, drip, trickle) (compare Latin sēbum (suet, tallow), Ancient Greek εἴβω (eíbō, to drop, drip). See soap.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

seep (third-person singular simple present seeps, present participle seeping, simple past and past participle seeped)

  1. (intransitive) To ooze or pass slowly through pores or other small openings, and in overly small quantities; said of liquids, etc.
    Water has seeped through the roof.
    The water steadily seeped in through the thirl.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To enter or penetrate slowly; to spread or diffuse.
    Woe seeped through her heart thinking of what had befallen their ethnic group.
    Fear began to seep into the local community over the contamination of their fishpond.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To diminish or wane away slowly.
    The resistance movement against the invaders had slowly seeped away.

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

seep (plural seeps)

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  1. A small spring, pool, or other spot where liquid from the ground (e.g. water, petroleum or tar) has oozed to the surface; a place of seeping.
  2. Moisture, liquid, gas, etc. that seeps out; a seepage.
  3. The seeping away of a liquid, etc.
  4. A seafloor vent.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zeep.

Noun[edit]

seep (plural sepe)

  1. soap

Descendants[edit]

  • Xhosa: isepha
  • Zulu: insipho

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German sêpe.

Noun[edit]

seep (genitive seebi, partitive seepi)

  1. soap

Declension[edit]


Massachusett[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

seep

  1. river