sip

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Sip, SIP, -sip, síp, Síp, şip, šíp, and сип

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sippen, of uncertain origin. Compare with Low German sippen (to sip). Possibly from a variant of Middle English suppen (to drink, sip) (see sup) or perhaps from Old English sipian, sypian (to take in moisture, soak, macerate), from Proto-Germanic *sipōną (to drip, trickle), from Proto-Indo-European *seyb- (to pour out, trickle, leak out). Compare also Old High German supfen (to drink, sip), from Proto-Germanic *sūpaną (to sip, intake).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: sĭp, IPA(key): /sɪp/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Noun[edit]

sip (plural sips)

  1. A small mouthful of drink

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sip (third-person singular simple present sips, present participle sipping, simple past and past participle sipped)

  1. (transitive) To drink slowly, small mouthfuls at a time.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, chapter 5, in Moonfleet, London; Toronto, Ont.: Jonathan Cape, published 1934:
      He held out to me a bowl of steaming broth, that filled the room with a savour sweeter, ten thousand times, to me than every rose and lily of the world; yet would not let me drink it at a gulp, but made me sip it with a spoon like any baby.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess[1]:
      A waiter brought his aperitif, which was a small scotch and soda, and as he sipped it gratefully he sighed.
    • 2013 August 3, “Revenge of the nerds”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      bright young things in jeans and T-shirts huddle around laptops, sipping lattes or munching on free food.
  2. (intransitive) To drink a small quantity.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Second Book of the Æneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      [She] rais'd it to her mouth with sober grace; / Then, sipping, offered to the next in place.
  3. To taste the liquor of; to drink out of.
    • 1697, Virgil, “The Fourth Book of the Georgics”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      They skim the floods, and sip the purple flowers.
  4. (Scotland, US, dated) Alternative form of seep
  5. (figuratively) To consume slowly.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sip

  1. (informal) yep

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sip (comparative sipper, superlative sipst)

  1. sad, subdued
    Synonyms: droevig, treurig

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of sip
uninflected sip
inflected sippe
comparative sipper
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial sip sipper het sipst
het sipste
indefinite m./f. sing. sippe sippere sipste
n. sing. sip sipper sipste
plural sippe sippere sipste
definite sippe sippere sipste
partitive sips sippers

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English safe, from Middle English sauf, safe, saf, saaf, from Old French sauf, saulf, salf (safe), from Latin salvus (whole, safe), from Proto-Indo-European *solh₂- (whole, every).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɪp]
  • Hyphenation: sip

Adjective[edit]

sip

  1. (colloquial) safe.
    1. not in danger; out of harm's reach.
      Synonym: aman
    2. free from risk.
      Synonym: terjamin
    3. reliable.
      Synonyms: mantap, elok, baik, sempurna

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English zip.

Noun[edit]

sip f (genitive singular sipe, nominative plural sipeanna)

  1. zip, zipper, zip fastener

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sip ship
after an, tsip
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly a calque of English yep.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sip

  1. (informal, neologism) yep, yeah, uh-huh

See also[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English ship.

Noun[edit]

sip

  1. ship