swack

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Scots swack, from Middle English swac (weak), from Old English *swæc (found in derivative swæcehēow (weakmindedness, nonsense)), from Proto-Germanic *swakaz (weak). Cognate with Saterland Frisian swäk, West Frisian swak, Dutch zwak, German Low German swack, German schwach.

Adjective[edit]

swack (comparative swacker, superlative swackest)

  1. (Scotland) Lithe; nimble.
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 37:
      it came the turn of a brave young childe with a red head and the swackest legs you ever saw, [...] and as soon as he began the drill you saw he'd carry off the prize.

Etymology 2[edit]

UK c. 1860s. Used at Christ's Hospital School, Sussex.

Noun[edit]

swack (plural swacks)

  1. (dated, Britain, school slang) A deception; a trick.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Farmer, John Stephen (1900) The Public School Word-Book[1], London: Hirshfeld Brothers, page 240
  • Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, 8th edition, 1984


Anagrams[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

swak +‎ -k

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

swack m

  1. diminutive of swak (brother-in-law)

Declension[edit]