clout

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /klaʊt/
    • (file)
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /klʌʊt/
  • Rhymes: -aʊt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English clout, from Old English clūt, from Proto-Germanic *klūtaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gelewdos, from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (to ball up, amass). The sense “influence, especially political” originated in the dialect of Chicago, but has become widespread.

Noun[edit]

clout (countable and uncountable, plural clouts)

  1. Influence or effectiveness, especially political.
    • 1975, Len O'Connor, Clout--Mayor Daley and His City[1], page 74:
      Having relinquished his clout in City Council to run for a place on the county board, and having lost stature by reason of his failure to win the presidency, Duffy was in no position to seek the party chairmanship for himself
    • 2011 December 15, Felicity Cloake, “How to cook the perfect nut roast”, in Guardian[2]:
      The chopped mushrooms add depth to both the Waitrose and the Go-Go Vegan recipe, but what gives the latter some real clout on the flavour front is a teaspoon of Marmite.
    • 2017, “Fake”, performed by Lil Skies:
      It's funny how they judge you when they see you made a change / I poured another four just to take away the pain / My friends weren't my friends, they was lookin' for some clout / I had what they wanted so they always came around
    • 2019 November 29, Taylor Lorenz, “Here’s What’s Happening in the American Teenage Bedroom”, in New York Times[3]:
      Rowan, like most teenagers on the internet, wasn’t after fame or money, though he made a decent amount — at one point $10,000 a month and more, he said. What Rowan wanted was clout. On the internet, clout is a social currency that can be used to obtain just about anything. Rack up enough while you’re young, and doors everywhere begin to open.
  2. (regional, informal) A blow with the hand.
    • 1910, Katherine Mansfield, Frau Brenchenmacher Attends A Wedding
      ‘Such a clout on the ear as you gave me… But I soon taught you.’
  3. (baseball, informal) A home run.
    • 2011, Michael Vega, "Triple double", in The Boston Globe, August 17, 2011, p. C1.
      '... allowed Boston to score all of its runs on homers, including a pair of clouts by Jacoby Ellsbury ...'
  4. (archery) The center of the butt at which archers shoot; probably once a piece of white cloth or a nail head.
  5. (regional, dated) A swaddling cloth.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chapter 12:
      When a new-hatched savage running wild about his native woodlands in a grass clout, followed by the nibbling goats, as if he were a green sapling; even then, in Queequeg’s ambitious soul, lurked a strong desire to see something more of Christendom than a specimen whaler or two.
  6. (archaic) A cloth; a piece of cloth or leather; a patch; a rag.
  7. (archaic) An iron plate on an axletree or other wood to keep it from wearing; a washer.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 1, page 546:
      Clouts were thin and flat pieces of iron, used it appears to strengthen the box of the wheel; perhaps also for nailing on such other parts of the cart as were particularly exposed to wear.
  8. A clout nail.
  9. (obsolete) A piece; a fragment.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

clout (third-person singular simple present clouts, present participle clouting, simple past and past participle clouted)

  1. To hit, especially with the fist.
  2. To cover with cloth, leather, or other material; to bandage, patch, or mend with a clout.
    • 15 March, 1549, Hugh Latimer, The Second Sermon preached before the King's Majesty at Westminster
      Paul, yea, and Peter, too, had more skill in [] clouting an old tent than to teach lawyers.
  3. To stud with nails, as a timber, or a boot sole.
  4. To guard with an iron plate, as an axletree.
  5. To join or patch clumsily.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

clout (third-person singular simple present clouts, present participle clouting, simple past and past participle clouted)

  1. Dated form of clot.
    • 1948, The Essex Review
      He tells us how to butter eggs, boil eels, clout cream, stew capons, how to make a fine cake, an almond pudding and a raspberry conserve, []

References[edit]

  1. ^ clout in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  2. ^ clout”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary: “ [] akin to Middle High German klōz lump, Russian gluda”.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English clūt, from Proto-West Germanic *klūt, from Proto-Germanic *klūtaz. Compare cloud.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

clout (plural cloutes)

  1. A (smaller) piece of fabric; a shred:
    1. A patch (fabric for mending).
    2. A bandage or dressing (for wounds)
    3. rag, tatter (piece of clothing)
  2. A (larger) piece of fabric; a cloth:
    1. Threadbare or inferior clothing.
    2. Cloth for wrapping babies; swaddling clothes.
    3. A burial shroud.
  3. A washer; a round metal panel.
  4. A fragment or shred.
  5. A strike, blow or hit.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: clout
  • Scots: clout, cloot
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

clout

  1. Alternative form of clouten