tabulate

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Mayor Erika Jansen and Town Councillor Emil Schmidt of Rosenthal in Hersberg, Basel-Landschaft, Switzerland, examining a tabulation of the harvesting rates of winter crops in December 1956.[1]

table +‎ -ate;[2] compare Late Latin tabulātus (having a floor; floored), perfect passive participle of tabulō (to fit with planks) + -ātus (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *-eh₂tos (suffix forming adjectives from nouns indicating the possession of a thing or a quality). Tabulō is derived from tabula (board, plank), of uncertain origin, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *teh₂- (a variant of *steh₂- (to stand)) + *-dʰlom (a variant of *-trom (suffix forming nouns denoting tools or instruments)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tabulate (third-person singular simple present tabulates, present participle tabulating, simple past and past participle tabulated)

  1. (transitive) To arrange in tabular form; to arrange into a table.
    • 1700, William Leybourn, “Instrumental Arithmetick. The Third Part. Teaching, by a New Artifice (not heretofore Published, to My Knowledge, in any Language.) The Manner how to Set Down any Decimal Fraction Required: [...] by Certain Scales Contrived, Suitable to the Coins, Weights and Measures Now Used in England. And for the Extracting of the Square and Cube Roots. Also, by Nepair’s Bones [...]”, in Arithmetick, Vulgar, Decimal, Instrumental, Algebraical. In Four Parts, 7th edition, London: Printed by J. Matthews, for Awnsham and John Churchill, at the Black-Swan in Pater-Noster-Row, OCLC 1012074788, section II (By Nepair’s Bones), subsection IV (How to Apply to Lay Down any Numbers by the Rods), proposition I (Any Number being Given, how to Tabulate or Lay Down the Same by Rods), page 265:
      Let it be required to Tabulate or lay down this Number 3496. Firſt, from among your Sets of Rods (or out of your Caſe) take four of them, of which let one of them have the Figure 3 at the top thereof, and lay it upon your Tabellet cloſe to the Edge thereof, []
    • 1872 January, “[Official Department. Thirty-eighth annual report.] Report of the President of the Agricultural College”, in J. P. Wickersham, editor, The Pennsylvania School Journal: An Educational Magazine, volume XX, number 7, Lancaster, Pa.: Wylie & Griest, Inquirer Printing House and Bindery, OCLC 950904134, page 226:
      It [the School Department] gives advice and instruction concerning their duties to thirteen thousand school directors and controllers, furnishes them blanks, receives and tabulates their reports, reviews their accounts, judges whether they have kept their schools open according to law, and, if so, pays them the State appropriation for their respecive districts.
    • 1903 March 25, G[opal] K[rishna] Gokhale, quoting Edward FitzGerald Law, “Budget Speech, 1903”, in Speeches of the Honourable Mr. G. K. Gokhale, C.I.E. Non-official Member of the Viceroys Legislative Council: With an Introduction and a Frontispiece, Madras: G[anapathi] A[graharam] Natesan & Co., Esplanade, published [1908], OCLC 559375551, page 62:
      The inevitable deduction from the figures tabulated must be that the material prosperity of the people as a whole is making good progress.
    • 1924 November, William Hulbert Barrow, “A General Athletic Ability Test”, in James Huff McCurdy, editor, American Physical Education Review, volume XXIX, number 9 (number 201 overall), [Springfield, Mass.: American Physical Education Association], OCLC 1480564, page 506, column 1:
      In addition to the evident needs mentioned above there is also a desire to standardize and tabulate results. The same desire in other fields has given rise to intelligence tests, psychological examinations, etc.
    • 1974, Allan B. Ellis, “Common Conceptions about Computers”, in The Use & Misuse of Computers in Education, New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Book Company, →ISBN, part I (What is a Computer?), page 15:
      [Herman] Hollerith, a statistician for the United States government, was faced with the task of tabulating the figures of the 1890 census at a time when such tabulating would take more than ten years if done by hand. [] Faced with this prospect, Hollerith conceived the idea of representing the census data as holes on punched cards and of building machines that would sort these cards according to the holes they contained and that would tabulate and otherwise analyze the data.
  2. (transitive) To set out as a list; to enumerate, to list.
    • 1867, Albert Günther, “Reptilia”, in Albert C[harles] L[ewis] G[otthilf] Günther, editor, The Record of Zoological Literature. 1866, volume III, London: John Van Voorst, Paternoster Row, OCLC 6715418, pages 121–122:
      Mr. [Edward Drinker] Cope has examined a collection from the territory of Arizona and in the Colorado district; it contained 44 species. [] He tabulates them according to their range into the neighbouring provinces, and points out that, herpetologically, the Sonoran and Lower Californian provinces are nearly as distinct from each other as the Sonoran is from the Central, []
    • 1941, R[oberto] Weiss, chapter II, in Humanism in England during the Fifteenth Century, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, OCLC 464753189, page 35:
      [John] Whethemstede's literary productions show his preference for encyclopedias in which he could tabulate under special headings the limits of his wide reading.
    • 1955, Vladimir Nabokov, chapter 5, in Lolita, Paris: Olympia Press, OCLC 487306850; republished New York, N.Y.: Crest Giant, Fawcett World Library, December 1959, OCLC 970501025, page 19:
      You have to be an artist and a madman, [] in order to discern at once, by ineffable signs—the slightly feline outline of a cheekbone, the slenderness of a downy limb, and other indices which despair and shame and tears of tenderness forbid me to tabulate—the little deadly demon among the wholesome children; she stands unrecognized by them and unconscious herself of her fantastic power.
  3. (transitive, Scotland, obsolete) To enter into an official register or roll.
    • 1687, George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh, “King James the Fifth, Parl. 5. [Act 52.]”, in Observations on the Acts of Parliament, [...], Edinburgh: Printed by the heir of Andrew Anderson, printer to His Most Sacred Majesty, and are to be sold by Thomas Brown, and other book-sellers, OCLC 912903021, page 134:
      The order of Tabulating Summonds is now much alter'd, for no Summonds are Tabulated except Actions of Declarators, Improbations, Contraventions, and other Actions at the King's Advocats inſtance, []
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

tabulate (plural tabulates)

  1. (pharmacy, obsolete) A pill, a tablet.
    • 1596, Philip Barrough [i.e., Philip Barrow], “Of Electuaries, and Conserues: of Lozenges, and Manus Christi”, in The Method of Phisick, Containing the Cavses, Signes, and Cvres of Inward Diseases in Mans Body, from the Head to the Foote. Whereunto is Added, The Forme and Rule of Making Remedies and Medicines, which Our Physitions Commonly Vse at this Day, with the Proportion, Quantitie, and Names of Each Medicine, book VII, 3rd corrected and augmented edition, Imprinted at London: By Richard Field, and are to be sold in Paules Church yard at the signe of the brasen Serpent, OCLC 800676065, pages 404–405:
      . the three kindes of ſaunders, and Diarrhodon Abbatis, ana. . j. the bone of the Hartes heart one in number, ſugar roſate tabulate, or white ſugar diſſolued in roſe water as much as ſufficeth, make an Electuarie, gild it with leaues of pure golde in weight . ß.
    • 1605, Christopher Wirtzung [i.e. Christof Wirsung]; Jacob Mosan, transl., “Of the Hart, the Most Precious Part of Mans Body”, in The General Practise of Physicke: Conteyning All Inward and Outward Parts of the Body, with All the Accidents and Infirmities that are Incident vnto Them, euen from the Crowne of the Head to the Sole of the Foote: [...] in the Germane Tongue, and now Translated into English, in Diuerse Places Corrected, and with Many Additions Illustrated and Augmented, [...], London: [Printed by Richard Field] Impensis [at the expense of] Georg[e] Bishop, OCLC 837735745, § 1 (Of the Fainting of the Hart in Generall. [The Order of Life or Diet for This Faintnes of the Hart.]), page 259:
      A Bad ſtomacke is otherwhiles no ſmall cauſe of this ſwouning, for it procureth before the ſwouning come a heate ouer the whole bodie. As ſoone as this ſhall be perceiued, it is not amiſſe to vſe for it confected Balſam wood, but in the ſtead thereof take Tabulates of Xyloaloe, which are very requiſite for it.
    • 1834, [Robert Southey], “Quack and No Quack, being an Account of Dr. Green and His Man Kemp. Popular Medicine, Herbary, Theory of Signatures, William Dove, John Wesley, and Baxter.”, in The Doctor, &c., volume I, London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green and Longman, OCLC 1020871086, page 236:
      For all faintness, hot agues, heavy fantasies and imaginations, a cordial was prepared in tabulates, which was called Manus Christi: the true receipt required one ounce of prepared pearls to twelve of fine sugar, boiled with rose water, violet water, cinnamon water, "or howsoever one would have them."

Etymology 2[edit]

Syringopora verticellata, a tabulate (member of Tabulata, an extinct order of corals, etymology 2, noun sense)[3]

Tabulata (extinct order of corals) +‎ -ate. Tabulata is derived from Latin tabulāta, from tabulātum (flooring, storey), from tabula (board, plank) + -tum (from -tus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *-tus (suffix forming action nouns from verb roots)). See further at etymology 1. The order is so named because the corals are characterized by having tabulae.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tabulate (not comparable)

  1. (paleontology) Describing a member of an extinct order of corals, the Tabulata: having tabulae (well-developed horizontal internal partitions within each cell).
    • 1865, Samuel Haughton, “Lecture VIII”, in Manual of Geology (Galbraith and Haughton’s Scientific Manuals, Experimental and Natural Science Series), London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, & Green, OCLC 13824300, page 192:
      [W]e find the Zoantharia, in section (1), divided into tabulate and non-tabulate corals. The specimen before us is evidently tabulate, and we therefore follow the reference to section (2), where we find the tabulate corals divided into those with and those without cœnenchyma.
    • 1868 January, “American Association for the Advancement of Science”, in David A. P. Watt, editor, The Canadian Naturalist and Geologist: A Bi-monthly Journal of Natural Science, Conducted by a Committee of the Natural History Society of Montreal (Second Series), volume III, number 4, Montreal, Que.: Dawson Brothers, Great St. James Street, OCLC 614204891, pages 294–295:
      On the Zoological Affinities of the Tabulate Corals; by Prof. A. E. Verrill.—The questions discussed in this paper were the position of the tabulate corals among Polyps, and the true value of the tabulate structure in classification. [] Prof. [Addison Emery] Verrill, therefore, concludes that the tabulate structure is of secondary importance as a character, in fixing their affinities, and that the Tabulata must be dismembered,—Halisites, Millepora, and their allies, being classed as Hydroids; and Pocillopora and Favosites with other extinct tabulated genera, as true Polyps.
    • 1879, H[enry] Alleyne Nicholson, “Thecidæ and Helioporidæ”, in On the Structure and Affinities of the “Tabulate Corals” of the Palæozoic Period: With Critical Descriptions of Illustrative Species, Edinburgh; London: William Blackwood and Sons, OCLC 562505554, page 236:
      The large corallites are tabulate, with indistinctly differentiated walls, provided with obtusely triangular and irregular septa, and having their visceral cavities more or less freely connected with one another by lateral horizontal channels, which penetrate the interstitial tubular tissue.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

tabulate (plural tabulates)

  1. (paleontology) A member of the order Tabulata.
    • 2013, Walter M. Goldberg, “A Brief History of Reefs and Corals”, in The Biology of Reefs and Reef Organisms, Chicago, Ill.; London: University of Chicago Press, →ISBN, section 13-2 (An Introduction to Paleozoic Corals), page 272, column 2:
      Both tabulates and rugosans evolved independently as part of the Ordovician Radiation; the tabulates appeared first in the Early Ordovician (~488 Mya), followed by rugosans about 20 My later.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Photograph from the collection of the German Federal Archives in Koblenz, Germany.
  2. ^ tabulate” (US) / “tabulate” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
  3. ^ From the collection of the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Milano (Milan Natural History Museum) in Milan, Italy.

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

tabulate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of tabulare
  2. second-person plural imperative of tabulare
  3. feminine plural of tabulato

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tabulāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of tabulātus