User talk:BigDom

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Again, welcome! —CodeCat 11:48, 11 July 2011 (UTC)

Luxembourgish inflection tables[edit]

I didn't realise that template was on your user page, so I moved it without thinking. I'm sorry about that! —CodeCat 16:08, 14 July 2011 (UTC)

No problem, you've probably saved me from moving it to the wrong place when it's finished! BigDom 16:13, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
I'm wondering something though. Should inflection tables apply the Eifeler Regel? Or is it really just a natural part of the grammar that is independent of verbs? —CodeCat 16:18, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
The 1st person perfect tense of accuséieren (to accuse) would be ech hunn accuséiert, but for drénken (to drink) it would be ech hu gedronk because of the Eifeler Regel, so the template needs to display something different depending on the first letter of the participle. I don't know if having separate templates is the best way to do it though. BigDom 16:27, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
Probably not, but I see I misunderstood what you were doing. I thought you were making the ending disappear on the verb forms themselves, such as accuséiere(n). I think for verbs with consonants that trigger the rule for words before them (like hunn) it would be better to add a new parameter. Because otherwise, you would risk having to duplicate every conjugation template - one for verbs that trigger the rule and one for those that don't. —CodeCat 16:32, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
Are you planning to use the same table for irregular verbs as well? If you are, then it might be better to put the table itself into a separate template called {{lb-conj-table}}, and call it from another one to provide the forms to fill in. —CodeCat 21:58, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
The irregular verbs have extra forms such as a preterite tense in the indicative mood, and a simple subjunctive tense, so you can't really use the same table. In fact, creating a table for irregular verbs is going to be pretty tricky seeing as by definition they don't have the same patterns, and there's vowel changes going on. BigDom 22:09, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
What I mean is to put just the table with empty cells in one template, and to give the cells their contents with another template. That way, the table looks consistent across the different variations. A lot of other languages like Dutch and Catalan have tables that work that way. —CodeCat 22:14, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
Sorry, I haven't done much work with templates so I don't know much about how they work. The table for irregular verbs would need an extra row in both the indicative and subjunctive, can you do this starting with the same basic table? It would need to be something like this: (ignore the 1, 2, 3 etc. these would nearly all need to be different) BigDom 22:25, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
That would need an extra table, yes, unless you make the single one more complicated. But do all irregular verbs need that extra row? Because if not, then a third template would be needed that shares the same table as the regular verbs, which means splitting it would be good anyway. —CodeCat 22:49, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
True, there are some irregular verbs that only have the regular tenses, just they have some irregular vowel changes. For example bannen (to bind) is almost the same as a regular verb except it becomes "bënns" rather than "bannt" in 2nd pers. sing. and "bënnt" rather than "bannt" in the 3rd person. But I see how the same basic table could be used. Like I say though, I don't have much experience with templates so I wouldn't know how to do it. BigDom 22:55, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
I understand templates quite well but I don't know much about Luxembourgish grammar, so I guess we'll need to work together. :) —CodeCat 23:07, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
I'm definitely not an expert on the grammar either but I'll try my best! I just realised that we'll need other templates for verbs with different auxiliary verbs. This is usually hunn (to have), but a few verbs use sinn (to be). So instead of hann, hues, huet, etc. they have sinn, bass, ass, .... BigDom 23:34, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
That's more or less the same thing as with the Eifeler Regel. You could make separate templates but because the difference is independent of the different types of verb, you would need to double them every time. It would be easier to have a parameter to set it, like the German and Dutch templates already have. In Dutch you can use a parameter like aux=zijn to change the auxiliary verb, and the German templates have a similar way. So maybe something like aux=sinn or just aux=s will do. —CodeCat 23:45, 14 July 2011 (UTC)
Yeah, it definitely seems like having a basic table to start from is the best way to go. But for me it will have to wait until the morning, I'm too tired to start fiddling with templates now! Cheers, BigDom 23:49, 14 July 2011 (UTC)

Right, I've made a user page here to try and make a basic table for the other templates to call from. I just can't get my head around the #if template, specifically the aux=sinn part. I've left my attempt at parameter {{{10}}} and if you could have a look at it that would be appreciated becuase it just seems to always display sinn with the current syntax. I also added the future indicative tenses, because I can't work out why I omitted them in the first place. BigDom 13:53, 15 July 2011 (UTC)

I just noticed that for the Template:lb-conj-regular it only needs two parameters rather than three. We could change all the current {{{1}}} into {{{1}}}en, and all the {{{3}}} into {{{1}}}. I think that the blank table should be all correct now so other templates would be able to call from it. BigDom 17:10, 15 July 2011 (UTC)

Minor request[edit]

For Luxembourgish nouns where there is a lowercase version on Wiktionary, could you include the template {{also}} at the top? For example Freed and Bijou, it would be {{also|freed}} and {{also|bijou}}. Thank you, --Mglovesfun (talk) 09:55, 16 July 2011 (UTC)

OK, I will do that in future. Thanks for the tip, BigDom 09:57, 16 July 2011 (UTC)
I for one (and I'm surely not the only one) am very grateful for your contributions here. Thank you. Mglovesfun (talk) 10:53, 19 July 2011 (UTC)
Thanks, it's nice to know the work is appreciated. I've really enjoyed my time improving the Wiktionary and hopefully I'll stay around for a while. BigDom 10:55, 19 July 2011 (UTC)

I, too, thank you for your entries. Another minor request: When adding a parenthetical qualifier or context to a definition, like "uncountable" to Kaffi's first definition, could you use {{context|uncountable|lang=lb}} rather than ''(uncountable)'', please? (I've already fixed Kaffi.)​—msh210 (talk) 16:51, 20 July 2011 (UTC)

Yes, will do. Still learning the ropes so thank you for the tips. BigDom 17:16, 20 July 2011 (UTC)
Pleasure. Feel free to ask me any questions at my talkpage.​—msh210 (talk) 17:20, 20 July 2011 (UTC)

superhero[edit]

how do u say superhero in lb?

Superheld, same as in German. BigDom 18:39, 6 August 2011 (UTC)
and Held for hero, i guess?
Yeah, and Heldin for heroine. BigDom 18:47, 6 August 2011 (UTC)

Sense of Stëft[edit]

What sense of the word Stëft (pen) is it? If it's in the sense of a writing instrument, I could add a category for that. Thanks anyway. --Lo Ximiendo 20:31, 12 August 2011 (UTC)

Categories can be crucial when organizing entries, I think. --Lo Ximiendo 21:01, 12 August 2011 (UTC)
How about a look at the Category:List of topics, visited by going from any category? It can be useful, I guess. --Lo Ximiendo 21:11, 12 August 2011 (UTC)

An idea for LB adjective table[edit]

I saw that you once removed the genitive line, but do you think it might be permissible to add it back with grayed links and a note that the genitive isn't used in modern Luxembourgish but might be encountered in old documents? I've no idea if they really might be encountered or how far back you'd have to go to find them, but we have done similar things for other languages. — [Ric Laurent] — 19:41, 5 September 2011 (UTC)

Yeah, I don't see why it couldn't be added back if there was a note. To be honest, I think it would be very unlikely to find many examples of the written genitive case because Luxembourgish was only a spoken language until relatively recently, but it doesn't hurt to have the conjugations there in case someone needs them. BigDom (tc) 19:49, 5 September 2011 (UTC)
Nifty business :) — [Ric Laurent] — 20:16, 5 September 2011 (UTC)

Eifeler Regel[edit]

Hi. Can you tell me what the Eifeler Regel is? And also, out of pure curiosity, how come you ended up adding Luxembourgish terms to English Wiktionary? --Rockpilot 17:51, 21 September 2011 (UTC)

Jeeër[edit]

Hi. Are you familiar with Luxembourgish phonology? If so, can you add the pronunciation of Jeeër? Thanks. — Ungoliant (Falai) 15:40, 28 March 2013 (UTC)

I'm never too confident in adding IPA for languages other than English, but if you go on the LOD and search for Jeeër there's a sound clip from a native speaker that you might be able to use. (Think you might need to have QuickTime player). Cheers, BigDom (tc) 16:30, 28 March 2013 (UTC)
OK. Thanks. — Ungoliant (Falai) 16:34, 28 March 2013 (UTC)

streaky[edit]

While used in cricket, I don't think this is a cricket only term per se, streaky in UK slang can mean lucky, as in due to good fortune; fortunate. I think a streaky boundary is a lucky boundary, which often means off the edge of the bat because a ball hit to the boundary off the middle of the bat isn't generally considered a luck shot. We should get SemperBlotto involved in this. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:35, 27 May 2013 (UTC)

I see what you're saying, maybe another sense is needed for the "lucky" meaning. Obviously it does have other meanings apart from in cricket, but in cricket it does have the specific notion of a shot that comes off the edge of the bat for runs; I've not heard it used to describe any other kind of shot. It's also used in other dialects apart from just the UK in the cricketing sense as well, for example the quotes I found are from Australia and South Africa. See what SemperBlotto says, he's better qualified than me in these matters. BigDom (tc) 17:40, 27 May 2013 (UTC)
My New Oxford Dictionary of English (2001) doesn't have it, but does have two senses we lack. Mglovesfun (talk) 17:43, 27 May 2013 (UTC)
I had always assumed that it referred to a shot in which the ball "streaked" away, often to the boundary. Who knows? SemperBlotto (talk) 18:47, 27 May 2013 (UTC)
p.s. Do we need a bacon-related definition? Or is that covered by def#1? SemperBlotto (talk)
We probably could make a distinction between streaky as in streaks of colour and streaky as in the streaks of fat in meat. BigDom (tc) 20:03, 27 May 2013 (UTC)
Yes the bacon sense is the other sense the ODE has. The luck sense is definitely really, but colloquial and maybe regional. Mglovesfun (talk) 10:47, 28 May 2013 (UTC)