vice

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See also: vice-

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman, from Old French, from Latin vitium (fault or blemish).

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. A bad habit.
    Smoking is a vice, not a virtue.
  2. (law) Any of various crimes related (depending on jurisdiction) to prostitution, pornography, gambling, alcohol, or drugs.
  3. A defect in the temper or behaviour of a horse, such as to make the animal dangerous, to injure its health, or to diminish its usefulness.
    • From the case of Scholefield v. Robb (1839). 2002, Gilligan, Brenda, Practical Horse Law (link), ISBN 0-632-05673-8:
      So a horse with say, navicular disease, making him suitable only for light hacking, would probably be unsound, whereas rearing would be a vice, being a "defect in the temper... making it dangerous". A vice can however render a horse unsound - possibly a crib biter will damage its wind.
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From French vis (screw, winding stairs), from Old French vis, viz, from Latin vitis (vine); akin to English withy.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice (plural vices)

  1. A mechanical screw apparatus used for clamping or holding (also spelled vise).
  2. A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements.
  3. (obsolete) A grip or grasp.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

vice (third-person singular simple present vices, present participle vicing, simple past and past participle viced)

  1. To hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice.
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, I. ii. 416:
      Camillo. As he had seen’t, or been an instrument / To vice you to't, that you have touched his queen / Forbiddenly
    • De Quincey
      The coachman's hand was viced between his upper and lower thigh.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin vice (in place of), ablative form of vicis.

Adjective[edit]

vice (no comparative or superlative)

  1. in place of; subordinate to; designating a person below another in rank
    vice president
    vice admiral
Derived terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. instead of, in place of
    A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned.

Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vice

  1. in rows

Related terms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Preposition[edit]

vice

  1. instead of

Adverb[edit]

vice

  1. instead

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vicem.

Noun[edit]

vice m, f (invariable)

  1. deputy, substitute, vice

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vice

  1. in place of, subordinate to

Noun[edit]

vice

  1. ablative singular of vicis

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

vīce

  1. vocative singular of vīcus

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m (plural vices)

  1. vice (bad habit)

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

vice m f (plural vices)

  1. used as an abbreviation of any word containing the prefix vice-

Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

více f pl (genitive víc, plurale tantum)

  1. purgatory

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

vice

  1. vice, second in rank, deputy, stand-in, acting

Related terms[edit]