wad

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See also: vad, văd, váð, vað, wæd, våd, wād, and WAD

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably short for Middle English wadmal (woolen cloth), from Old Norse váðmál (woolen stuff), from váð (cloth) + mál (measure). See wadmal. Cognate with Swedish vadd (wadding, cotton wool), German Wat, Watte (wad, padding, cotton wool), Dutch lijnwaad, gewaad, watten (cotton wool), Old English wǣd (garment, clothing) (English: weed). More at weed, meal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wad (plural wads)

  1. An amorphous, compact mass.
    Our cat loves to play with a small wad of paper.
  2. A substantial pile (normally of money).
    With a wad of cash like that, she should not have been walking round Manhattan
  3. A soft plug or seal, particularly as used between the powder and pellets in a shotgun cartridge.
  4. (slang) A sandwich.
  5. (vulgar, slang) An ejaculate of semen.
  6. (mineralogy) Any black manganese oxide or hydroxide mineral rich rock in the oxidized zone of various ore deposits.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

wad (third-person singular simple present wads, present participle wadding, simple past and past participle wadded)

  1. To crumple or crush into a compact, amorphous shape or ball.
    She wadded up the scrap of paper and threw it in the trash.
  2. (Ulster) To wager.
  3. To insert or force a wad into.
    to wad a gun
  4. To stuff or line with some soft substance, or wadding, like cotton.
    to wad a cloak

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *wat, from Proto-Germanic *wadą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

wad n (plural wadden, diminutive wadje n)

  1. mud flat

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

wad m (invariable)

  1. (mineralogy) wad (manganese ore)

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *waidą, whence also Old High German weit

Noun[edit]

wād ?

  1. woad

Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

wad

  1. (South Scots) would