Caucasian

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See also: caucasian

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Caucasus +‎ -ian. The anthropological sense was popularized by Johann Friedrich Blumenbach, based on the belief that the first humans originated from there.[1][2][3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Caucasian (comparative more Caucasian, superlative most Caucasian)

  1. Of, or relating to the Caucasus region or its people, languages and culture.
  2. (anthropology) Of a racial classification; pertaining to people having certain phenotypical features such as straight, wavy or curly hair and very light to brown pigmented skin, and originating from Europe, parts of Northern Africa and Western, Central and South Asia.
    Synonyms: Caucasoid, Europid
  3. (US, of a person) White, being a white person.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

Caucasian (plural Caucasians)

  1. A native or inhabitant of the Caucasus.
  2. (anthropology) A member of the Caucasian racial classification.
  3. (US) A white person.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:white person
    • 2008, Ridley Pearson, Killer View:
      The male Caucasian, twenty-four, a skier, was said to have been missing for over three hours.
  4. (linguistics) A group of languages spoken in the Caucasus area.
  5. (humorous, bartending) The White Russian, a cocktail consisting of coffee liqueur, vodka, and milk. Made popular by the 1998 film The Big Lebowski.
    • 1998, Jeff Bridges as The Dude, The Big Lebowski, written by Joel and Ethan Coen:
      I'll go out and mingle. Jesus, you mix a hell of a Caucasian, Jackie.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Johann Friedrich Blumenbach (1795) De generis humani varietate nativa (in Latin), page 289
  2. ^ Johann Friedrich Blumenbach (1798) Über die natürlichen Verschiedenheiten im Menschengeschlechte (in German), Leipzig, page 213
  3. ^ Stephen Jay Gould (November 1994), “The Geometer of Race”, in Discover Magazine, pages 65-69: “Blumenbach's definition cites two reasons for his choice—the maximal beauty of the people from this small region, and the probability that humans were first created in this area.”