brig

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See also: bríg

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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a Brig-rigged vessel

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviated from brigantine, from Italian brigantino; in sense “jail”, from the use of such ships as prisons.

Noun[edit]

brig (plural brigs)

  1. (nautical) A two-masted vessel, square-rigged on both foremast and mainmast
  2. (US) A jail or guardhouse, especially in a naval military prison or jail on a ship, navy base, or (in fiction) spacecraft.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Scots brig, from Old Norse bryggja, from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Doublet of bridge.

Noun[edit]

brig (plural brigs)

  1. (Scotland, Northern Ireland, Northern England) Bridge.

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of brigadier

Noun[edit]

brig (plural brigs)

  1. Brigadier.

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Old English bryċġ.

Noun[edit]

brig

  1. Alternative form of brigge

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Old Norse bryggja. Doublet of brigge.

Noun[edit]

brig

  1. bridge
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Scots: brig, brigg, breeg
    • English: brig, brigg

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brig

  1. inflection of brí:
    1. accusative/dative singular
    2. nominative/vocative/accusative dual/plural

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
brig brig
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbrig
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Polabian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bergъ.

Noun[edit]

brig m

  1. bank, shore (of a river)

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English brig, from Old Norse bryggja.

Noun[edit]

brig

  1. bridge
    Stirling BrigStirling Bridge
    The craic brigThe craic bridge (craic is an Irish spelling of the word crack, but both spellings have the same meaning)
    • 1839, The Life of Mansie Wauch[1]:
      “Dinna flatter me,” said James; [] replacing his glasses on the brig of his nose, he then read us a screed of metre [].
      “Don’t flatter me,” said James; [] replacing his glasses on the bridge of his nose, he then read us a screed of metre.

Descendants[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English brig.

Noun[edit]

brig m (Cyrillic spelling бриг)

  1. A brig (two-masted vessel)

Synonyms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brig m (plural brigau)

  1. crest, peak, summit, top

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
brig frig mrig unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.