cortina

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See also: Cortina

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cortina (veil).

Noun[edit]

cortina (plural cortinas)

  1. (mycology) A cobweb-like annulus on certain types of mushroom.
    • 2004, Ursula Peintner, Jean-Marc Moncalvo & Rytas Vilgalys, “Toward a better understanding of the infrageneric relationships in Cortinarius (Agaricales, Basidiomycota)”, in Mycologia, volume 96, number 5, DOI:10.1080/15572536.2005.11832904, page 1054:
      /Telamonia morphologically circumscribes a homogenous group of Cortinarii. Hygrophanous pilei, the lack of viscid or gelatinous veils and well-developed cortinas characterize most species.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron).

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron).

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortines)

  1. curtain (piece of cloth covering a window)

Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan cortina, from Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortines)

  1. curtain

Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Attested since circa 1300. Probably from Old Spanish cortina, from Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from cortem, accusative singular of cors (enclosure). Doublet of cortiña (garden).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain (cloth)
    • 1326, López Ferreiro, Antonio (ed.): Galicia Histórica. Colección diplomática. Santiago: Tipografía Galaica. page 295:
      mando esta mia cama assy como iaz con sous panos et con suas cortinas et ceo
      I bequeath this my bed, as it is, with its clothes and with its curtains and ceiling

References[edit]

  • cortina” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • cortina” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • cortina” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • cortina” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • cortina” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /korˈti.na/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧ti‧na

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortine)

  1. curtain

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Sometimes imputed to Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn, bend), but dubious.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortīna f (genitive cortīnae); first declension

  1. cauldron, kettle
  2. the sacred tripod of Apollo, metonymically for the curved seat or covering; Oracle
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneis 3.90-92:
      vix ea fatus eram: tremere omnia visa repente,/liminaque laurusque dei, totusque moveri/mons circum et mugire adytis cortina reclusis.
      I had just spoken: everything seemed to shake suddenly,/the threshold and the laurels of the god, and the whole hill/seemed round us to move, and the tripod of the revealed shrine seemed to groan.
  3. (Late Latin, Ecclesiastical) curtain, after the resemblance of the curve of an amphitheatre to a cauldron

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cortīna cortīnae
Genitive cortīnae cortīnārum
Dative cortīnae cortīnīs
Accusative cortīnam cortīnās
Ablative cortīnā cortīnīs
Vocative cortīna cortīnae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • cortina in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cortina in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cortina in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cortina in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cortina in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan cortina, from Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron).

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron).

Adjective[edit]

cortina f (oblique plural cortinas, nominative singular cortina, nominative plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cortina, cortinha, from Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron), from cortem, accusative singular of cors (enclosure).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain (piece of cloth covering a window)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • cortina” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /korˈtina/, [korˈt̪ina]
  • Hyphenation: cor‧ti‧na
  • Rhymes: -ina

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]