cortina

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See also: Cortina

English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain). Doublet of curtain.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cortina (plural cortinas)

  1. (mycology) A cobweb-like annulus on certain types of mushroom.
    • 2004, Ursula Peintner, Jean-Marc Moncalvo, Rytas Vilgalys, “Toward a better understanding of the infrageneric relationships in Cortinarius (Agaricales, Basidiomycota)”, in Mycologia, volume 96, number 5, →DOI, page 1054:
      /Telamonia morphologically circumscribes a homogenous group of Cortinarii. Hygrophanous pilei, the lack of viscid or gelatinous veils and well-developed cortinas characterize most species.

Derived terms

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See also

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Anagrams

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Aragonese

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Etymology

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Inherited from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /koɾˈtina/
  • Rhymes: -ina
  • Syllabification: cor‧ti‧na

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

References

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  • Bal Palazios, Santiago (2002) “cortina”, in Dizionario breu de a luenga aragonesa, Zaragoza, →ISBN
  • cortina”, in Aragonario, diccionario aragonés–castellano (in Spanish)

Asturian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /koɾˈtina/, [koɾˈt̪i.na]
  • Rhymes: -ina
  • Hyphenation: cor‧ti‧na

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortines)

  1. curtain (piece of cloth covering a window)

Catalan

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Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortines)

  1. curtain

Etymology 2

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Inherited from Late Latin cōrtīna (bit of enclosed land).

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortines)

  1. pigsty

References

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  • “cortina” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese cortina~cortinha, from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “cortina”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “cortina”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • cortina” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • cortina” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • cortina” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /korˈti.na/
  • Rhymes: -ina
  • Hyphenation: cor‧tì‧na

Etymology 1

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Inherited from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortine)

  1. curtain
Derived terms
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References

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  • cortina1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Classical Latin cortīna (sacred tripod of Apollo).

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortine)

  1. sacred tripod of Apollo

References

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  • cortina2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

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Latin

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Etymology 1

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Uncertain. Sometimes attributed to Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (turn; bend), via a hypothetical passive past participle *kṛto- (bent), but this is dubious. Attested from Plautus onward.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cortīna f (genitive cortīnae); first declension

  1. cauldron, kettle
  2. the sacred tripod of Apollo (in the form of a cauldron)
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 3.90–92:
      vix ea fatus eram tremere omnia visa repente liminaque laurusque dei totusque moveri mons circum et mugire adytis cortina reclusis
      I had scarcely uttered these words when suddenly everything seemed to shake—the holy thresholds, the god's laurel tree—and the entire mountain stirred, and as the temple's inner sanctum was revealed the sacred tripod bellowed.
Declension
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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cortīna cortīnae
Genitive cortīnae cortīnārum
Dative cortīnae cortīnīs
Accusative cortīnam cortīnās
Ablative cortīnā cortīnīs
Vocative cortīna cortīnae
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Italian: cortina
  • Middle French: courtine

Etymology 2

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From cōrt- (courtyard) +‎ -īna, a calque of Ancient Greek αὐλαία (aulaía, curtain) < αὐλή (aulḗ, courtyard). First attested in the fourth century CE.[2] Unrelated to Etymology 1.[3]

Alternative forms

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Noun

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cōrtīna f (genitive cōrtīnae); first declension (Late Latin)

  1. curtain
Descendants
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Etymology 3

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From cōrt- (yard; enclosure) +‎ -īna (late 'vulgar' diminutive ending). Attested from at least ca. 560 CE (Paulus Galeatensis).[4]

Alternative forms

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Noun

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cōrtīna f (genitive cōrtīnae); first declension (Late Latin)

  1. bit of enclosed land (for various purposes)
Descendants
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References

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  • cortina”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cortina”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cortina in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cortina”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cortina”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 138
  2. ^ Walther von Wartburg (1928–2002) “cortīna”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 2: C Q K, page 1237
  3. ^ Joan Coromines, José A. Pascual (1984) “cortina”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), volumes II (Ce–F), Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN, page 216
  4. ^ Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976) “curtina”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: E. J. Brill, page 294

Occitan

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Etymology

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From Old Occitan cortina, from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Old Galician-Portuguese

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Etymology 1

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From Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

The form with /ɲ/ ⟨nh⟩ represents the regular native outcome. The form with ⟨n⟩ /n/ appears to reflect influence either from Old Spanish cortina or the original Latin. Either way, it provided a means of avoiding homophony with etymology 2.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /koɾˈtina/, /koɾˈtiɲa/

Noun

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cortina f

  1. curtain
    • 1326, López Ferreiro, Antonio (ed.): Galicia Histórica. Colección diplomática. Santiago: Tipografía Galaica. page 295:
      mando esta mia cama assy como iaz con sous panos et con suas cortinas et ceo
      I bequeath this bed of mine as it is, together with its bedding, curtains, and canopy
Descendants
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References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “cortina”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG

Etymology 2

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Noun

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cortina f

  1. Alternative form of cortinha (plot of land)

Old Occitan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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cortina f (oblique plural cortinas, nominative singular cortina, nominative plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Descendants

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References

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Old Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain). First attested in Berceo.

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain
Descendants
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  • Spanish: cortina (see there for further descendants)

References

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Etymology 2

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Inherited from Late Latin cōrtīna (bit of enclosed land). First attested in 1118.

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. bit of enclosed land
Descendants
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References

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Portuguese

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Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology

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Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese cortina~cortinha, from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Pronunciation

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  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /koʁˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ/ [kohˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ], /kuʁˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ/ [kuhˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ]
    • (São Paulo) IPA(key): /koɾˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ/, /kuɾˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ/
    • (Rio de Janeiro) IPA(key): /koʁˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ/ [koχˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ], /kuʁˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ/ [kuχˈt͡ʃĩ.nɐ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /koɻˈt͡ʃi.na/

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain (piece of cloth covering a window)

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old Spanish cortina, from Late Latin cōrtīna (curtain).

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain
    Synonym: telón
Derived terms
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Descendants
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Etymology 2

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Inherited from Old Spanish cortina, from Late Latin cōrtīna (bit of enclosed land). Found in Salamanca and Cespedosa de Tormes.

Noun

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cortina f (plural cortinas) (regional, Spain)

  1. bit of enclosed land

References

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Further reading

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