cortina

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See also: Cortina

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin cortina (veil)

Noun[edit]

cortina

  1. A cobweb-like annulus on certain types of mushroom.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortines)

  1. curtain (piece of cloth covering a window)

Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortines)

  1. curtain

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /korˈti.na/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧ti‧na

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortine)

  1. curtain

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Sometimes imputed to Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn, bend), but dubious.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortīna f (genitive cortīnae); first declension

  1. cauldron, kettle
  2. the sacred tripod of Apollo, metonymically for the curved seat or covering; Oracle
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneis 3.90-92:
      vix ea fatus eram: tremere omnia visa repente,/liminaque laurusque dei, totusque moveri/mons circum et mugire adytis cortina reclusis.
      I had just spoken: everything seemed to shake suddenly,/the threshold and the laurels of the god, and the whole hill/seemed round us to move, and the tripod of the revealed shrine seemed to groan.
  3. (Late Latin, Ecclesiastical) curtain, after the resemblance of the curve of an amphitheatre to a cauldron

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cortīna cortīnae
Genitive cortīnae cortīnārum
Dative cortīnae cortīnīs
Accusative cortīnam cortīnās
Ablative cortīnā cortīnīs
Vocative cortīna cortīnae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • cortina in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cortina in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cortina in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cortina in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cortina in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Occitan[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin cortina.

Adjective[edit]

cortina f (oblique plural cortinas, nominative singular cortina, nominative plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese cortina, cortinha, from Late Latin cortīna (curtain), from Latin cortīna (cauldron), from cortem, accusative singular of cors (enclosure).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain (piece of cloth covering a window)

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Medieval Latin cōrtīna (curtain), from Latin cohors (court, enclosure).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /korˈtina/, [korˈt̪ina]
  • Hyphenation: cor‧ti‧na

Noun[edit]

cortina f (plural cortinas)

  1. curtain

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]