flagellum

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English[edit]

Flagellum (PSF).png

Etymology[edit]

From Latin flagellum (whip), diminutive of flagrum, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlag- (to strike).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flagellum (plural flagella or flagellums or flagellae)

  1. (biology) In protists, a long, whiplike membrane-enclosed organelle used for locomotion or feeding.
  2. (biology) In bacteria, a long, whiplike proteinaceous appendage, used for locomotion.
  3. A whip

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin flagellum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /flaːˈɣɛ.lʏm/
  • Hyphenation: fla‧gel‧lum

Noun[edit]

flagellum m (plural flagella)

  1. flagellum
    Synonyms: flagel, zweepdraad, zweephaar, zweepstaart

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From flagrum (scourge, whip) +‎ -ellum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

flagellum n (genitive flagellī); second declension

  1. whip, lash, scourge
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 25.9–13:
      Quae nunc tuīs ab unguibus reglūtinā et remitte,
      nē lāneum latusculum manūsque mollicellās
      inusta turpiter tibī flagella cōnscribillent,
      et īnsolenter aestuēs, velut minūta magnō
      deprēnsa nāvis in marī, vesāniente ventō.
      Which now from your fingernails unglue and send back,
      so that your soft side and your tender hands
      burning lashes may not shamefully scribble on,
      and that you may not unaccustomedly writhe, like a small
      ship caught in the great sea, with the wind raging.
  2. whip for driving animals (riding horses, cattle etc.)
  3. tentacle
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Metamorphoses 4.361–372:
      Dēnique nītentem contrā ēlābīque volentem
      inplicat ut serpēns, quam rēgia sustinet āles
      sublīmemque rapit: pendēns caput illa pedēsque
      adligat et caudā spatiantēs inplicat ālās;
      utve solent hederae longōs intexere truncōs,
      utque sub aequoribus dēprēnsum pōlypus hostem
      continet ex omnī dīmissīs parte flagellīs.
      Perstat Atlantiadēs spērātaque gaudia nymphae
      dēnegat; illa premit commissaque corpore tōtō
      sīcut inhaerēbat, 'pugnēs licet, inprobe,' dīxit,
      'nōn tamen effugiēs. Ita, dī, iubeātis, et istum
      nūlla diēs ā mē nec mē dēdūcat ab istō.'
      Then the struggling and wanting to slip away one
      she embraces like a snake, which the king bird holds
      and snatches to the heights: hanging, it ties around the head and feet
      and wraps around the spreading wings;
      or how ivies are accustomed to weave into long trunks,
      and how under the seas the polyp holds fast the captured enemy
      with tentacles dispatched from every side.
      The son of Atlas resists and the hoped for joy to the nymph
      he denies; she holds on and, joined as if with the entire body
      she were clinging, 'You may fight, indomitable boy,' she said,
      'you shall still not escape. This, gods, grant me, and him
      may no day take away from me nor me from him.
  4. young branch, shoot
    • c. 4th century, Tiberianus, Pervigilium Veneris 5–6:
      Crās amōrum cōpulātrīx inter umbrās arborum
      implicat casās virentēs dē flagellō myrteō.
      Tommorow the binder of loves amongst the shades of trees
      weaves green cottages from myrtle branches.

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative flagellum flagella
Genitive flagellī flagellōrum
Dative flagellō flagellīs
Accusative flagellum flagella
Ablative flagellō flagellīs
Vocative flagellum flagella

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]