lascar

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hindi लश्कर (laśkar), from Persian لشکر(lashkar).

Noun[edit]

lascar (plural lascars)

  1. (now chiefly historical) A sailor from India or Southeast Asia, especially as serving on a European ship.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, “chapter 47”, in The Moon and Sixpence:
      A motley crowd saunters along the streets — Lascars off a P. and O., blond Northmen from a Swedish barque, Japanese from a man-of-war, English sailors, Spaniards, pleasant-looking fellows from a French cruiser, negroes off an American tramp.
    • 1973, Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow:
      ...and what foreigner is it, exactly, that Pirate has in mind if it isn't that stateless lascar across his own mirror-glass, that poorest of exiles...
    • 2020, Sujit Sivasundaram, Waves Across the South, William Collins 2021, p. 35:
      As for the voyage itself, his account of Mauritius, where the ship stopped, saw the appearance of Muslim lascars.
  2. (Anglo-Indian) A tent-pitcher; also a type of artilleryman.
  3. Any of various nymphalid butterflies of the Asian genera Pantoporia and Lasippa.

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: las‧car

Verb[edit]

lascar (first-person singular present indicative lasco, past participle lascado)

  1. to chip

Conjugation[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lasˈkaɾ/, [lasˈkaɾ]

Verb[edit]

lascar (first-person singular present lasco, first-person singular preterite lasqué, past participle lascado)

  1. (nautical, transitive) to slacken; slip

Conjugation[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

lascar m (plural lascars)

  1. lascar

Further reading[edit]