lope

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See also: Lope, lopë, løpe, and Lop

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Alteration of loup, from Old Norse hlaupa (to leap, jump)[1]. See leap. Cognate with German laufen (walk, run), Danish løbe, Dutch lopen (walk, run), Norwegian løpe (run). Doublet of leap.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lope (third-person singular simple present lopes, present participle loping, simple past and past participle loped)

  1. To travel an easy pace with long strides.
    He loped along, hour after hour, not fast but steady and covering much ground.
    • 1957, Jack Kerouac, chapter 5, in On the Road, Viking Press, OCLC 43419454, part 5:
      And as we waited in the car Victor got out and loped over to the house and said a few words to an old lady, []
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      “And the holidays?” Murgo proposed one evening as they loped down a bridlepath past lovers fondling in the grass. “Fun, are they? High living?”
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To jump, leap.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

lope (plural lopes)

  1. An easy pace with long strides.
    • 1931, Home Geographic Monthly (volumes 1-2, page 45)
      Hares have larger, leaner bodies, longer legs, and longer ears than the true rabbit. They also run with a lope instead of a hop. It is thought that they developed this more stream-lined body and swifter gait from running on the plains []

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “lope”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

lope

  1. plural of loop

Chinook Jargon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English rope.

Noun[edit]

lope

  1. rope

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lope

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of lopen

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of salope.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lope f (plural lopes)

  1. (slang, derogatory) male homosexual
  2. (by extension, derogatory) cowardly, characterless man
    • 1994, Yasmina Reza, ‘Art’:
      Marc. Si c’est grâce à lui que tu es revenu tendre ton autre joue, tu peux le remercier. Il a fait de toi une lope, mais tu es content, c’est l’essentiel.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Further reading[edit]


Inari Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Related to Northern Sami lohpi.

Noun[edit]

lope

  1. promise

Inflection[edit]

Even e-stem, p-v gradation
Nominative lope
Genitive love
Singular Plural
Nominative lope loveh
Accusative love luuvijd
Genitive love luvij
luuvij
Illative lopán luuvijd
Locative looveest luuvijn
Comitative luuvijn luvijguin
Abessive lovettáá luvijttáá
Essive loppeen
Partitive loppeed
Possessive forms
Singular Dual Plural
1st person
2nd person
3rd person

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Suppletive:

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈloːpə/
  • Hyphenation: lo‧pe

Verb[edit]

lope

  1. (intransitive) to run
  2. (intransitive) to flow
  3. (intransitive) to sprout
  4. (intransitive, + mäd) to interact (with)

Conjugation[edit]

References[edit]

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “lope”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN