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Haitian Creole[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French paire (pair).

Noun[edit]

  1. pair, couple

Etymology 2[edit]

From French peur (fear).

  1. pair, couple

Verb[edit]

  1. to fair, to be dread, to be afraid, to be scared

Lombard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pes. Cognates include Italian piede and Spanish pie.

Noun[edit]

 m

  1. foot

Louisiana Creole[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from French père (father).

Noun[edit]

  1. father, dad
    Synonyms: pap, papa, papi, popa
Alternative forms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from French peur (fear).

Adjective[edit]

  1. Alternative form of pœr ((to be) scared)

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan pe, from Latin pēs.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [pɛ]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

 m (plural pès)

  1. foot

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

 m (plural pès)

  1. (obsolete) Pre-reform spelling (until Brazil 1943/Portugal 1911) of .

Romagnol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pēs (foot).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Central Romagnol): IPA(key): [ˈpɛ]

Noun[edit]

 m (plural )

  1. foot
    L’è cun un int la fósa.
    He is with a foot in the hole.

References[edit]

Masotti, Adelmo (1996) Vocabolario Romagnolo Italiano [Romagnol-Italian dictionary] (in Italian), Bologna: Zanichelli, page 430

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pēs (foot), from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Noun[edit]

 m (plural peis)

  1. (anatomy, Puter, Vallader) foot

Tarantino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin per.

Preposition[edit]

  1. for
  2. through
  3. in, on
  4. by
  5. with
  6. as

Unami[edit]

Verb[edit]

(plural)(intransitive)

  1. (animate, intransitive) he / she comes


References[edit]

  • Rementer, Jim with Pearson, Bruce L. (2005) “”, in Leneaux, Grant, Whritenour, Raymond, editors, The Lenape Talking Dictionary, The Lenape Language Preservation Project