pons

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See also: Pons

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pōns (bridge). Doublet of Pontus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pɒnz/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒnz

Noun[edit]

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pons (plural pontes)

  1. (anatomy) A bridge-like tissue connecting two parts of an organ.
  2. (neuroanatomy) A band of nerve fibres, from the Latin term pōns Varoliī, within the brain stem.

Holonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

pons

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of pondre

Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pons m (plural ponsow)

  1. bridge

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from German Punze.

Noun[edit]

pons m (plural ponsen, diminutive ponsje n)

  1. punch (tool for punching or drilling holes)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English punch.

Noun[edit]

pons m (uncountable)

  1. Obsolete form of punch.

Latin[edit]

pōns (bridge)

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *pónteh₁s (path, road), from *pent- (path). Cognate with Sanskrit पथिन् (páthin), Ancient Greek πόντος (póntos), Old Armenian հուն (hun, riverbed), Old English findan (English find), and Old Church Slavonic пѫть (pǫtĭ, road).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pōns m (genitive pontis); third declension

  1. A bridge, a construction or natural feature that spans a divide.
    • c. 52 BCE, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico 6.6:
      Caesar partitis copiis cum Gaio Fabio legato et Marco Crasso quaestore celeriterque effectis pontibus adit tripertito, aedificia vicosque incendit, magno pecoris atque hominum numero potitur.
      Caesar, having divided his forces with C. Fabius, his lieutenant, and M. Crassus his questor, and having hastily constructed some bridges, enters their country in three divisions, burns their houses and villages, and gets possession of a large number of cattle and men.
  2. (nautical) deck
    • c. 117 CE, Tacitus, Annales 2.6:
      Multae pontibus stratae, super quas tormenta veherentur.
      Many (ships) were covered with decks, on which engines for missiles might be conveyed.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pōns pontēs
Genitive pontis pontium
Dative pontī pontibus
Accusative pontem pontēs
pontīs
Ablative ponte pontibus
Vocative pōns pontēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Aromanian: punti
  • Asturian: ponte, puente
  • Breton: pont
  • Calabrian: puonti
  • Catalan: pont
  • Cornish: pons
  • Dalmatian: puant
  • English: pontoon

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • pons in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pons in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pons in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • pons in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to build a bridge over a river: pontem facere in flumine
    • to build a bridge over a river: inicere pontem
    • there is a bridge over the river: pons est in flumine
    • to break down a bridge: pontem dissolvere, rescindere, interscindere (B. G. 2. 9. 4)
    • (ambiguous) to build a bridge over a river: flumen ponte iungere
  • pons in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pons in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 479-480