populor

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Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

populor (present infinitive populārī, perfect active populātus sum); first conjugation, deponent

  1. I lay waste, ravage or devastate
  2. I plunder or pillage
  3. I destroy or ruin

Inflection[edit]

   Conjugation of populor (first conjugation, deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present populor populāris, populāre populātur populāmur populāminī populantur
imperfect populābar populābāris, populābāre populābātur populābāmur populābāminī populābantur
future populābor populāberis, populābere populābitur populābimur populābiminī populābuntur
perfect populātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect populātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect populātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present populer populēris, populēre populētur populēmur populēminī populentur
imperfect populārer populārēris, populārēre populārētur populārēmur populārēminī populārentur
perfect populātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect populātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present populāre populāminī
future populātor populātor populantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives populārī populātus esse populātūrus esse
participles populāns populātus populātūrus populandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
populārī populandī populandō populandum populātum populātū

References[edit]

  • populor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • populor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • populor” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) democracy: imperium populi or populare, civitas or res publica popularis