prog

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See also: Prog, próg, prōg, and prog.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviations.

Adjective[edit]

prog (not comparable)

  1. Abbreviation of progressive.
    • 2003, Frank Moriarty, Seventies Rock: The Decade of Creative Chaos:
      Captain Beyond had tentatively dipped their toe in the uncharted American waters of prog rock, but in England, progression was the name of the game, with a host of bands elevating themselves []

Noun[edit]

prog (plural progs)

  1. (informal, music) Progressive rock.
    He listens to a lot of prog.
  2. (computing, informal) A program.
    • 2001, "n.one", transfer progs from comp to comp (on newsgroup 24hoursupport.helpdesk)
      [] is there some way to connect to my new comp so I can transfer some of the software progs []
    • 2001, linux.redhat, Usenet:
      "Yoda", How do I get progs to run when linux 7.1 starts up?
    • 2003, "Leo Edwards", Automating the Windows backup prog to commence backups? (on newsgroup microsoft.public.win98.apps)
      I've looked around if I can get the prog to start a backup itself, but it still requires some manual commands.
  3. (UK, university slang, dated) A proctor.
  4. (informal, politics) A progressive.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

prog (third-person singular simple present progs, present participle progging, simple past and past participle progged)

  1. to programme
  2. (meteorology) to prognosticate, forecast

Etymology 2[edit]

A variant of proke.

Noun[edit]

prog (countable and uncountable, plural progs)

  1. (obsolete, slang) Provisions, food and supplies, particularly for a journey.
    • 1726, Jonathan Swift, Molly Mog
      O nephew! your grief is but folly;
      ⁠In town you may find better prog
    • 1822 May 21, Geoffrey Crayon [pseudonym; Washington Irving], “Dolph Heyliger”, in Bracebridge Hall, or The Humourists. A Medley. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), New York, N.Y.: [] C. S. Van Winkle, [], OCLC 1141021983:
      Let's see what prog we have for supper; the kettle has boiled long enough; my stomach cries cupboard []
    • 1864, Robert Browning, Too Late
      So long as he picked from the filth his prog.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt, Olympia Press:
      The glutton castaway, the drunkard in the desert, the lecher in prison, they are the happy ones. To hunger, thirst, lust, every day afresh and every day in vain, after the old prog, the old booze, the old whores, that's the nearest we'll ever get to felicity, the new porch and the very latest garden.
  2. (obsolete) Plunder; booty.
  3. (obsolete, slang) A vagrant beggar; a tramp.
  4. (dialect) A pointed instrument.

Verb[edit]

prog (third-person singular simple present progs, present participle progging, simple past and past participle progged)

  1. (obsolete, usually of an animal) To feed and care for oneself, as opposed to being fed and cared for by someone (like a domesticated animal).
    • 1716, Isaac Barrow, The Works. Published by John Tillotson, page 26:
      To be wise about affares of this life (these fleeting, these empty, these deceitful shadows) is a sorry wisdom; to be wise in purveying for the flesh, is the wisdom of a beast, which is wise enough to prog for its sustenance;
    • 1743, The Pleasures of Matrimony, page 132:
      An old Fox thinks he has given his young Cubs Portion enough, when he has taught them to shift in the World: At first he provides Lambs and Chickens for them; but when once they come to be at the age of discretion, he thinks it enough that he has begot them wit and parts, and leave them to prog for themselves .
    • 1744, Thomas Brown, The Second Volume of the Works of Mr. Thomas Brown: Containing Letters from the Dead to the Living and from the Living to the Dead, together with Dialogues of the Dead, page 316:
      Or was it my duty to keep and maintain them, after they were of fufficient bigness to prog for themselves? The birds and beasts take care of their young no longer than till they are able to care for themselves ; and why should man be confin'd to more severe laws in that point than his vassal-creatures?
    • 1794, Great Britain. Board of Agriculture, General View of the Agriculture of the County of Nottingham, page 135:
      The most hardy and best qualified to prog for for themselves, are the Chinese; a cross with with which breed upon almost any other, may under most circumstances, be prudently recommended; let the breed be what it may, a well-proportioned stock to every farm will most abundantly requite the car, and repay the expence of the necessary food, provided for them.
  2. (obsolete) To seek food and wealth as opposed to pursuing spiritual goals.
    • 1680, An Exposition of Ecclesiastes, Or, The Preacher, page 345:
      They abuse what light of Reason they have, rendring it a slave to those brutish powers of life (it ought to direct and rule over ) so as to prog about and fetch in provisions for them.
    • 1737, Robert South, Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions, page 458:
      For God knows that is too apt to provide for itself, and to prog and purvey for the satisfaction of its vile desires.
    • 1747, John Scott ·, The Christian Life, page 30:
      And when it is so apparent that the main of our Design is to prog for our Flesh , and make a comfortable Provision for a few Years Ease and Luxury, who would think that we believed ourselves to be immortal Spirits that must live for ever in an inconceivable Happiness or Misery?
    • 1752, Letters, To all Lovers of Virtue and Taste, page 614:
      First of all let me admonish you , not to be too hasty to prog for Riches. For Solomon sayth': He that hastenth to be rich, shall not be innocent , but Poverty Poverty shall come upon him.
  3. (obsolete, slang) To seek food, goods, or money by low arts, such as begging, trickery, or abuse of power.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), new edition, London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, OCLC 913056315:
      a perfect artist in progging for money
    • 1698, John Milton, Miltons Historical and Political Works, page 271:
      And yet this most mild, though withal dreadful and inviolable Prerogative of Christs Diadem, Excommunication servs for nothing with them, but to prog and pander for Fees, or to display their Pride, and sharpen their Revenge, debarring Men the protection of the Law; and I remember not whether in some Cases it breave not Men all right to their worldly Goods and Inheritances, besides the denial of Christian burial.
    • 1711, Lucian (of Samosata.), The Works of Lucian, page 137:
      they shut me up in a by Place of their Appartment, and, as they us'd to prog for themselves, I us'd also to watch the Opportunity of their Bathing, or any other Business that call'd 'em both side; then I fed like a Farmer, mightily pleas'd, that now I was come to a Diet that suited naturally to my Appetite.
    • 1724, Mr. Boyer, The Political State of Great Britain - Volume 27, page 282:
      That whatever Zeal be endeavour'd to shew, for the King, his Joy terminated in himself; may too justly be retorted upon himself, and that whatever Zeal he may pretend in Broaching Arbitrary Maxims, and in Slandering some Persons of the first Rank, his only Aim is thereby to prog for an Offal of the King's Bounty.
    • 1788, Edmund Burke, Speech in the Impeachment of Warren Hastings
      I have been endeavouring to prog for you.
  4. (obsolete, slang) To steal; to rob; to filch.
    • 1708, Daniel Defoe, The Union-Proverb: Viz. If Skiddaw Has a Cap, Scruffell Wots full well of That, page 302:
      And hence we may take it for granted, there will always be some lavish People in every Prince's Court, where a Royal Table is kept, to waste and confound; to prog for themselyes, and regale their Friends, and to destroy more in one Day, by their clandestine Tricks, than would ine half the CROWN'D HEADS in Europe. But imbeziling of Belly-Timber, they think is no such extraordinary Offence in a Palace, tithout any Regard all the While to Conscience and Honour, or the King they cheat.
    • 1711, Anonymous, Atlas Geographus: Or, A Compleat System of Geography, page 220:
      Their Servants have their Meat reach'd them by their Masters, which they eat behind their Backs. They bring twice as much WIne as their Masters need, and drink the Remainder themselves. They seize on what is left after Dinner. And their Ladies each of them carry a Napkin to prog for dry'd Sweet-meats or Fruits.
    • 1780, Francis Quarles, Quarles' Emblems, divine and moral, page 44:
      What less than fool is man to prog and plot, And lavish out the cream of all his care, To gain poor seeming goods, which, being got, Make firm possession but a thoroughfare;
  5. (Scotland) To prick; to goad; to progue.
    • 1797, Allan Ramsay ·, A collection of Scots proverbs, page 119:
      An' on his royal paunches thole A dwarf to prog him wi' a pole; While he wad shaw his fangs, an' rage Wi' bootless wrangling in his cage.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English prog.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /prɔɡ/
  • Hyphenation: prog

Noun[edit]

prog m (uncountable)

  1. (music) prog, progressive rock
    • 2019 October 11, "GONG: Love From Planet Gong; The Virgin Years 1973-1975", Mania, issue 361, page 41.
      In een ongelofelijk korte periode van drie jaar gaat de hippieband onder leiding van oppergnoom Daevid Allen van psychedelische prog met Canterbury-invloeden naar een gestroomlijnde jazzrockformatie, waarbij maar twee bandleden (gitarist Steve Hillage en saxofonist Didier Malherbe) overlappen.
      Within an incredibly short period of three years, the hippie band directed by supreme gnome Daevid Allen shifts from psychedelic prog with influences from the Canterbury scene to a streamlined jazz rock formation, in which only two band members (guitarist Steve Hillage and saxophonist Didier Malherbe) overlap.
    Synonyms: progressieve rock, progrock

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *porgъ. Cognate with Upper Sorbian próh, Polish próg, Czech práh, Old Church Slavonic прагъ (pragŭ, doorpost), Russian поро́г (poróg).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prog m

  1. threshold (bottom-most part of a doorway that one crosses to enter)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Starosta, Manfred (1999), “prog”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag