satin

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See also: Satin, sätin, and sat in

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French satin, which is derived from "Zaitun", the Arabic name for the Chinese city of Quanzhou, itself derived from Arabic زَيْتُون(zaytūn, Zayton; olive). [1][2][3]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsætɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætɪn

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

satin (countable and uncountable, plural satins)

  1. A cloth woven from silk, nylon or polyester with a glossy surface and a dull back. (The same weaving technique applied to cotton produces cloth termed sateen).

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

satin (not comparable)

  1. Semigloss.
    satin paint

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

satin (third-person singular simple present satins, present participle satining, simple past and past participle satined)

  1. (transitive) To make (paper, silver, etc.) smooth and glossy like satin.

Further reading[edit]

  • satin at OneLook Dictionary Search

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.lexico.com/definition/satin
  2. ^ https://www.dictionnaire-academie.fr/article/A9S0525
  3. ^ Tellier, Luc-Normand (2009), Urban World History: An Economic and Geographical Perspective, Quebec: University of Quebec Press, p. 221, ISBN 978-2-7605-1588-8, archived from the original on 2015-09-24, retrieved 2015-12-16.

Anagrams[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English satin, from Old French satin, from Italian setino, probably via unattested Late Latin sētīnus (silken [cloth]), from Latin sētā.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: sa‧tin

Noun[edit]

satin

  1. satin

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

satin m (invariable)

  1. satin
    Synonyms: raso, setino, zetani, zettani (obsolete)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of satisne.

Adverb[edit]

satin (not comparable)

  1. introducing questions
    Satin' hoc plane?Is this beyond all doubt?
    Satin' omnia ex sententia?Is everything going according to plan?
    Satin' salva sunt omnia?Is everything sound?

References[edit]

  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • are you in your right mind: satin (= satisne) sanus es?