satin

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See also: Satin, sätin, and sat in

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French satin, from Italian setino, probably via unattested Late Latin sētīnus (silken [cloth]), from Latin sētā.[1] A common folk-etymology derives it instead from Arabic زَيْتُون (zaytūn, Zayton; olive),[2] a calque of Quanzhou's former Chinese nickname 刺桐城 (Tung Tree City), after the trees which had been extensively planted there in the 10th century by Liu Congxiao,[3] but that derivation is unsupported.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

satin (not comparable)

  1. Semi-glossy. Particularly describing a type of paint.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

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satin (plural satins)

  1. A cloth woven from silk, nylon or polyester with a glossy surface and a dull back. (The same weaving technique applied to cotton produces cloth termed sateen).

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "satin, n. (and adj.)" in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1909.
  2. ^ E.g., Henry Yule's "Chinchew" entry for the Encyclopædia Britannica, 9th ed., 1878.
  3. ^ Kauz, Ralph. Aspects of the Maritime Silk Road, p. 145.

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

satin m (invariable)

  1. satin

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A contraction of satisne.

Adverb[edit]

satin

  1. introducing questions
    Satin' hoc plane?
    Is this beyond all doubt?
    Satin' omnia ex sententia?
    Is everything going according to plan?
    Satin' salva sunt omnia?
    Is everything sound?

References[edit]

  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • are you in your right mind: satin (= satisne) sanus es?